Victor Hugo

Victor
Hugo
1802
1885

French Author, Poet, Novelist and Dramatist, one of the best-known French Romantic Writers

Author Quotes

The school is the resultant of pedantry; the school is the literary excrescence of the budget; the school is intellectual mandarinship governing in the various authorized and official teachings, either of the press or of the state, from the theatrical feuilleton of the prefecture to the biographies and encyclopedias duly examined and stamped and hawked about, and made sometimes, by way of refinement, by republicans agreeable to the police; the school is the classic and scholastic orthodoxy, with its unbroken girdle of walls, Homeric and Virgilian antiquity traded upon by official and licensed literati — a sort of China calling itself Greece; the school is, summed up in one concretion which forms part of public order, all the knowledge of pedagogues, all the history of historiographers, all the poetry of laureates, all the philosophy of sophists, all the criticism of pedants, all the ferules of the teaching friars, all the religion of bigots, all the modesty of prudes, all the metaphysics of partisans, all the justice of bureaucrats, all the old age of dapper young men bereft of their virility, all the flattery of courtiers, all the diatribes of censer-bearers, all the independence of flunkeys, all the certitudes of the short-sighted and of base souls. The school is the resultant of pedantry; the school is the literary excrescence of the budget; the school is intellectual mandarinship governing in the various authorized and official teachings, either of the press or of the state, from the theatrical feuilleton of the prefecture to the biographies and encyclopedias duly examined and stamped and hawked about, and made sometimes, by way of refinement, by republicans agreeable to the police; the school is the classic and scholastic orthodoxy, with its unbroken girdle of walls, Homeric and Virgilian antiquity traded upon by official and licensed literati — a sort of China calling itself Greece; the school is, summed up in one concretion which forms part of public order, all the knowledge of pedagogues, all the history of historiographers, all the poetry of laureates, all the philosophy of sophists, all the criticism of pedants, all the ferules of the teaching friars, all the religion of bigots, all the modesty of prudes, all the metaphysics of partisans, all the justice of bureaucrats, all the old age of dapper young men bereft of their virility, all the flattery of courtiers, all the diatribes of censer-bearers, all the independence of flunkeys, all the certitudes of the short-sighted and of base souls.

The universe contains what is necessary and only what is necessary. (II.3.iii)

There are moments when a man has a furnace in his brain.

There is in admiration a certain strength that dignifies and enlarges the intellect.

There was Boulatruelle's mistake. He believed in the straight line; a respectable optical illusion, but one that ruins many men.

The big events Veola not taken into account

The daylight of history is merciless; it has the strange and magical quality that, although it is composed of light, and precisely because of this, it casts shadows where once only brilliance was to be seen, making of one man two images, each opposed to the other, so that the darkness of the despot counteracts the majesty of the leader. The world arrives at a more balanced judgment.

The greatness of democracy is that it denies nothing and renounces nothing of humanity. Next to the rights of Man, side by side with them, at least, are the rights of the Soul.

The jostling of young minds against each other has this wonderful attribute, that one can never foresee the spark, nor predict the flash.

The owl goes not into the nest of the lark.

The secret of genius is to carry the spirit of the child into old age, which means never losing your enthusiasm.

The Utopia that grows impatient and turns into riot knows what awaits her; almost always she is too soon. Then she resigns herself and stoically accepts, instead of triumph, catastrophe.

There are moments when hideous possibilities besiege us like a throng of furies and break down the doors of our brain.

There is in every village a torch - the teacher; and an extinguisher- the clergyman.

There was in Paris, at that period, in an old hovel, in the Rue Beautreillis, near the Arsenal, an ingenious Jew, whose business it was to change a rascal into an honest man.

The blinder the passion, the more tenacious it is. It is never more solid than when it is unreasonable.

The drama is complete poetry. The ode and the epic contain it only in germ; it contains both of them in a state of high development, and epitomizes both.

The guilty one is not he who commits the sin, but the one who causes the darkness.

The last resort of kings, the cannonball. The last resort of the people, the paving stone.

The ox suffers, the cart complains.

The sickness of a nation does not kill Man.

The victims should always be arrested first.

There are no trifles in the human story, no trifling leaves on the tree.

There is no distress so complete but that even in the most critical moments the inexplicable sunrise of hope is seen in its depths.

These Greek capitals, black with age, and quite deeply graven in the stone, with I know not what signs peculiar to Gothic calligraphy imprinted upon their forms and upon their attitudes, as though with the purpose of revealing that it had been a hand of the Middle Ages which had inscribed them there, and especially the fatal and melancholy meaning contained in them, struck the author deeply.

Author Picture
First Name
Victor
Last Name
Hugo
Birth Date
1802
Death Date
1885
Bio

French Author, Poet, Novelist and Dramatist, one of the best-known French Romantic Writers