Walter Bagehot

Walter
Bagehot
1826
1877

English Economist, Critic, Businessman, Essayist, Social Darwinist and Journalist who wrote extensively about Literature, Government and Economic Affairs

Author Quotes

Credit means that a certain confidence is given, and a certain trust reposed. Is that trust justified? and is that confidence wise? These are the cardinal questions. To put it more simply credit is a set of promises to pay; will those promises be kept?

It is an inevitable defect, that bureaucrats will care more for routine than for results.

Poverty is an anomaly to rich people. It is very difficult to make out why people who want dinner do not ring the bell.

The habit of common and continuous speech is a symptom of mental deficiency. It proceeds from not knowing what is going on in other people's minds.

What impresses men is not mind, but the result of mind.

A Parliament is nothing less than a big meeting of more or less idle people.

Don't worry about life, you're not going to survive it anyway.

It is often said that men are ruled by their imaginations; but it would be truer to say they are governed by the weakness of their imaginations.

Progress would not have been the rarity it is if the early food had not been the late poison.

The less money lying idle the greater is the dividend.

Whatever expenditure is sanctioned - even when it is sanctioned against the ministry's wish - the ministry must find the money. Accordingly, they have the strongest motive to oppose extra outlay.... The ministry is (so to speak) the breadwinner of the political family, and has to meet the cost of philanthropy and glory; just as the head of a family has to pay for the charities of his wife and the toilette of his daughters.

A political country is like an American forest; you have only to cut down the old trees, and immediately new trees come up to replace them.

Dullness in matters of government is a good sign, and not a bad one - in particular, dullness in parliamentary government is a test of its excellence, an indication of its success.

Its mystery is its life. We must not let in daylight upon magic.

Royalty is a government in which the attention of the nation is concentrated on one person doing interesting actions.

The most intellectual of men are moved quite as much by the circumstances which they are used to as by their own will. The active voluntary part of a man is very small, and if it were not economized by a sleepy kind of habit, its results would be null.

When great questions end, little parties begin.

A princely marriage is the brilliant edition of a universal fact, and, as such, it rivets mankind.

Free government is self-government. A government of the people by the people. The best government of this sort is that which the people think best.

Life is a school of probability

So long as war is the main business of nations, temporary despotism - despotism during the campaign - is indispensable.

The most melancholy of human reflections, perhaps, is that, on the whole, it is a question whether the benevolence of mankind does most good or harm.

Woman absent is woman dead.

A schoolmaster should have an atmosphere of awe, and walk wonderingly, as if he was amazed at being himself.

He believes, with all his heart and soul and strength, that there is such a thing as truth; he has the soul of a martyr with the intellect of an advocate.

Author Picture
First Name
Walter
Last Name
Bagehot
Birth Date
1826
Death Date
1877
Bio

English Economist, Critic, Businessman, Essayist, Social Darwinist and Journalist who wrote extensively about Literature, Government and Economic Affairs