William Cecil, Lord Burghley, 1st Baron Burghley, also Lord William Cecil Burleigh

William
Cecil, Lord Burghley, 1st Baron Burghley, also Lord William Cecil Burleigh
1520
1598

English Statesman, Chief Advisor and Lord Treasurer of Queen Elizabeth

Author Quotes

The shortest way to do many things is to do only one thing at once

Their Lordships of the Upper House...are one member of the Parliament; and also that the Knights, Citizens and Burgesses of this House representing the whole Commons of this Realm are also another member of the same Parliament; and her Majesty the Head; and that of these three Estates doth consist the whole body of Parliament able to make laws.

Upon this I sent to the Register who brought me the [twenty-four] articles, which I have read and find so curiously penned, so full of branches and circumstance, as I think the Inquisitors of Spain use not so many questions to comprehend and to trap their prey. ? this kind of proceeding is too much savouring of the Roman inquisition, and is rather a device to seek for offenders than to reform any.

A Pack of Spanish Lies sent abroad in the world, first printed in the Spanish tongue, and translated out of the original. Now ripped up, unfolded and by just examination condemned, as containing false, corrupt and detestable wares worthy to be damned and burned.

Don't borrow money from a neighbor or a friend, but of a stranger where, paying for it you shall hear of it no more.

England can never be ruined except by a parliament.

For which I heartily thank you as she serveth me to great purpose. For she maketh my hunting very certain and speedy. She hath never failed me, for almost every day this week but brought me in the right way to a deer. And this last week she brought me to a stag which myself had stricken with my bow, being forced to the soil where, with the help of a greater water spaniel that forced him out of the water, your good brach helped to pluck him down.

He [King Philip II of Spain] is the mightiest enemy that England ever had, mightier than his father, the emperor Charles, or any other monarch of Christendom was these many years. ? Her Majesty's special and most proper defence must be by ships. For ships of England, her Majesty is of her own proper ships so strong as the enemy shall not be able to land any power where her Majesty's navy shall be near to the enemy's navy. The ships of her subjects are also at this day both in number, in strength, in all captains and mariners, stronger than ever they were in memory of man.

I doubt not but the fire illuminating heaven on Michelmas eve was seen there ? such as I never saw for the time more fearful. God sendeth us such signs but for our erudition.

Overthrow the Low Countries, which hitherto have been as a counterscarp to your Majesty's kingdom.

Spain seeks to overthrow the Low Countries, which hitherto have been as a counterscarp to your Majesty's kingdom.

The Queen of England has more cause to procure the preservation of the Low Countries in their ancient estate in the obedience of the house of Burgundy than any other place hath...Now if the Low Countries should either be subdued to the Spaniards or possessed by the French, England cannot continue this manner of league. For if the Spaniard shall possess this country by conquest, as otherwise they cannot, then must they also govern it as conquers?that is build in every country and special towns, forts and castles which must be kept and guarded with Spaniards...To maintain these the King must continue great taxes...and there will be no reason to stop him but he will set what tax he listeth upon the commodities of England and so shall England wax poor to make him rich. And then England will have no remedy.

Be not served with kinsmen, or friends, or men entreated to stay; for they expect much, and do little; nor with such as are amorous, for their heads are intoxicated; and keep rather too few, than one too many.

Never trust anybody not of sound religion, for he that is false to God can never be true to man.

Praise your children openly, reprove them secretly.

What! All this for a song?

Win hearts, and you have all men's hands and purses.

Beware of suretyship for thy best friend. He that payeth another man’s debt seeketh his own decay. But if thou canst not otherwise choose, rather lend the money thyself upon good bonds, although thou borrow it; so shalt thou secure thyself, and pleasure thy friend.

Trust not any man with thy life, credit, or estate. For it is mere folly for a man to enthrall himself to his friend, as though, occasion being offered, he should not dare to become an enemy.

Author Picture
First Name
William
Last Name
Cecil, Lord Burghley, 1st Baron Burghley, also Lord William Cecil Burleigh
Birth Date
1520
Death Date
1598
Bio

English Statesman, Chief Advisor and Lord Treasurer of Queen Elizabeth