William Morris

William
Morris
1834
1896

English Poet, Artist, Textile Designer, Libertarian Socialist associated with the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood

Author Quotes

All wonder of pleasure, all doubt of desire, all blindness, are ended, and no more ye feel if your feet treat his flowers or the flames of his fire, if your breast meet his balms or the edge of his steel. Change is come, and past over, no more strife, no more learning: now your lips and your forehead are sealed with his seal, look backward and smile at the thorns and the burning. — sweet rest, o my soul, and no fear of returning!

Dawn talks to day over dew-gleaming flowers, night flies away

From out the throng and stress of lies, from out the painful noise of sighs, one voice of comfort seems to rise: "It is the meaner part that dies."

I hope that we shall have leisure from war, -- war commercial, as well as war of the bullet and the bayonet leisure from the knowledge that darkens counsel leisure above all from the greed of money, and the craving for that overwhelming distinction that money now brings I believe that, as we have even now partly achieved liberty, so we shall achieve equality, and best of all, fraternity, and so have leisure from poverty and all its griping, sordid cares.

It is for him that is lonely or in prison to dream of fellowship, but for him that is of a fellowship to do and not to dream.

Love is enough: have no thought for to-morrow if ye lie down this even in rest from your pain, ye who have paid for your bliss with great sorrow.

No pillager or wrecker had been there; it seemed that time had passed on otherwhere, nor laid a finger on this hidden place rich with the wealth of some forgotten race.

Simplicity of life, even the barest, is not a misery, but the very foundation of refinement: a sanded floor and whitewashed walls, and the green trees, and flowery meads, and living waters outside; or a grimy palace amid the smoke with a regiment of housemaids always working to smear the dirt together so that it may be unnoticed; which, think you, is the most refined, the most fit for a gentleman of those two dwellings? So I say, if you cannot learn to love real art; at least learn to hate sham art and reject it. It is not because the wretched thing is so ugly and silly and useless that I ask you to cast it from you; it is much more because these are but the outward symbols of the poison that lies within them; look through them and see all that has gone to their fashioning, and you will see how vain labor, and sorrow, and disgrace have been their companions from the first — and all this for trifles that no man really needs!

The largest thing that these young black men and women stood for was to tell young black people that there is no obstacle that you can't overcome. That you can achieve your dreams. That hard work and perseverance and education will pay off, but you'll have to sacrifice to attain that.

Therefore, I bid you not dwell in hell but in heaven, or while ye must, upon earth, which is a part of heaven, and forsooth no foul part.

What is this the sound and rumor What is this that all men hear, Like the wind in hollow valleys when the storm is drawing near, Like the rolling of the ocean in the eventide of fear 'Tis the people marching on

Fellowship is heaven, and lack of fellowship is hell fellowship is life, and lack of fellowship is death and the deeds that ye do upon the earth, it is for fellowship's sake that ye do them.

Author Picture
First Name
William
Last Name
Morris
Birth Date
1834
Death Date
1896
Bio

English Poet, Artist, Textile Designer, Libertarian Socialist associated with the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood