William Temple, fully Archbishop William Temple

William
Temple, fully Archbishop William Temple
1881
1944

English Priest in the Church of England, Bishop of Manchester, Archbishop of York and Archbishop of Canterbury

Author Quotes

All government may be esteemed to grow strong or weak as the general opinion in those that govern is seen to lessen or increase.

Frugal and industrious men are friendly to the established government, as the idle and expensive are dangerous.

Is it a small crime to wound himself by anguish of heart, to deprive himself of all the pleasures, or eases, or enjoyments of life?

Of the several forms of government that have been or are in the world, that cause seems commonly the better that has the better advocate, or is advantaged by fresher experience.

Submission is the only reasoning between a creature and its Maker, and contentment in his will is the best remedy we can apply to misfortunes.

The only way for a rich man to be healthy is, by exercise and abstinence, to live as if he were poor.

We may be confident whatever God does is intended for our good, and whatever we interpret otherwise we can get nothing by repining, nor save anything by resisting.

All spirits, by frequent use, destroy, and at last extinguish, the natural heat of the stomach.

Good breeding is as necessary a quality in conversation, to accomplish all the rest, as grace in motion and dancing.

It is a mistake to assume that God is interested only, or even chiefly, in religion.

Our complaints are like arrows shot up into the air at no target: and with no purpose they only fall back upon our own heads and destroy ourselves.

Temperance, that virtue without pride, and fortune without envy, that gives indolence of body with an equality of mind; the best guardian of youth and support of old age; the precept of reason as well as religion, and physician of the soul as well as the body; the tutelar goddess of health and universal medicine of life.

The problem of evil... Why does God permit it? Or, if God is omnipotent, in which case permission and creation are the same, why did God create it?

What great thing soever a man proposed to do in his life, he should think of achieving it by fifty.

All the precepts of Christianity command us to moderate our passions, to temper our affections, towards all things below.

Goodness, as that which makes men prefer their duty and their promise before their passions or their interest, and is properly the object of trust, in our language goes rather by the name of honesty: though what we call an honest man the Romans called a good man; and honesty, in their language, as well as in French, rather signifies a composition of those qualities which generally acquire honour and esteem.

It is best to leave nature to her course, who is the sovereign physician in most diseases.

Our present time is indeed a criticizing and critical time, hovering between the wish, and the inability to believe. Our complaints are like arrows shot up into the air at no target: and with no purpose they only fall back upon our own heads and destroy ourselves.

The abilities of man must fall short on one side or the other, like too scanty a blanket when you are abed. - If you pull it upon your shoulders, your feet are left bare; if you thrust it down to your feet, your shoulders are uncovered.

The prophets were taught to know the will of God, and thereby instruct the people, and enabled to prophesy as a testimony of their being sent by heaven.

What is called by the poets apathy or dispassion, by the sceptics indisturbance, by the Molinists quietism, by common men peace of conscience, seems all to mean but great tranquility of mind.

All the world is perpetually at work, only that our poor mortal lives should pass the happier for that little time we possess them, or else end the better when we lose them: upon this occasion riches came to be coveted, honors esteemed, friendship pursued, and virtues admired.

He that by harshness of nature and arbitrariness of commands uses his children like servants is what they mean by a tyrant.

It may easily be conceived by any that can allow for the lameness and shortness of translations out of languages and manners of writing differing from ours.

Piety, as it is thought a way to the favour of God, and fortune, as it looks like the effect either of that, or at least of prudence and courage, beget authority.

Author Picture
First Name
William
Last Name
Temple, fully Archbishop William Temple
Birth Date
1881
Death Date
1944
Bio

English Priest in the Church of England, Bishop of Manchester, Archbishop of York and Archbishop of Canterbury