Winston Churchill, fully Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill

Winston
Churchill, fully Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill
1874
1965

British Conservative Politician, Statesman, Historian, Artist, Writer, Served twice as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Awarded Nobel Prize in Literature, Honorary Citizen of the United States, Commander of the 6th Battalion of the Royal Scots Fusiliers, Minister of Munitions, Secretary of State for War, First Lord of the Admiralty, Chancellor of the Exchequer

Author Quotes

We must not lose our faculty to dare, particularly in dark days.

We shape our buildings, and afterwards our buildings shape us. Having dwelt and served for more than forty years in the late Chamber, and having derived very great pleasure and advantage therefrom, I, naturally, should like to see it restored in all essentials to its old form, convenience and dignity.

What is our policy? ... to wage war against a monstrous tyranny, never surpassed in the dark, lamentable catalogue of human crime.

We occasionally stumble over the truth but most of us pick ourselves up and hurry off as if nothing had happened.

We should have felt more confidence in the success of our policy. We should have seen that he [Hitler] risked falling between two stools.

What is the true and original root of Dutch aversion to British rule? It is the abiding fear and hatred of the movement that seeks to place the native on a level with the white man ? the Kaffir is to be declared the brother of the European, to be constituted his legal equal, to be armed with political rights.

We often hear military experts inculcate the doctrine of giving priority to the decisive theatre. There is a lot in this. But in war this principle, like all others, is governed by facts and circumstances; otherwise strategy would be too easy. It would become a drill-book and not an art; it would depend upon rules and not on an instructed and fortunate judgment of the proportions of an ever-changing scene.

We sit in calm, airy, silent rooms opening upon sunlit and embowered lawns, not a sound except of summer and of husbandry disturbs the peace; but seven million men, any ten thousand of whom could have annihilated the ancient armies, are in ceaseless battle from the Alps to the Ocean.

What is the use of living, if it be not to strive for noble causes and to make this muddled world a better place for those who will live in it after we are gone? How else can we put ourselves in harmonious relation with the great verities and consolations of the infinite and the eternal? And I avow my faith that we are marching towards better days. Humanity will not be cast down. We are going on swinging bravely forward along the grand high road and already behind the distant mountains is the promise of the sun.

We ought to have saints' days to commemorate the great discoveries which have been made for all mankind, and perhaps for all time?or for whatever time may be left to us. Nature ... is a prodigal of pain. I should like to find a day when we can take a holiday, a day of jubilation when we can fˆte good Saint Anaesthesia and chaste and pure Saint Antiseptic. ... I should be bound to celebrate, among others, Saint Penicillin...

We sleep safely at night because rough men stand ready to visit violence on those who would harm us.

What kind of a people do they (Japan) think we are? Is it possible they do not realize that we shall never cease to persevere against them until they have been taught a lesson which they and the world will never forget?

We owe something to extravagance, for thrift and adventure seldom go hand in hand.

We used to be a source of fuel; we are increasingly becoming a sink. These supplies of foreign liquid fuel are no doubt vital to our industry, but our ever-increasing dependence upon them ought to arouse serious and timely reflection. The scientific utilization, by liquefaction, pulverization and other processes, or our vast and magnificent deposits of coal, constitutes a national object of prime importance.

What kind of people do they [the Japanese] think we are?

We see the crude and corrupt beginnings of a higher civilization blotted out by the ferocious uprising of the native tribes. Still, it is the primary right of men to die and kill for the land they live in, and to punish with exceptional severity all members of their own race who have warmed their hands at the invaders' hearth.

We were not made by Nature to work, or even to play, from eight o'clock in the morning till midnight. We ought to break our days and our marches into two.

What kind of people do they think we are? Is it possible they do not realize that we shall never cease to preserve against them until they have been taught a lesson which they and the world will never forget?

We may now picture this great Fleet, with its flotillas and cruisers, steaming slowly out of Portland Harbor, squadron by squadron, scores of gigantic castles of steel wending their way across the misty, shining sea, like giants bowed in anxious thought. We may picture them again as darkness fell, eighteen miles of warships running at high speed and in absolute blackness through the narrow Straits, bearing with them into the broad waters of the North the safeguard of considerable affairs....The King?s ships were at sea.

We shall defend every village, every town and every city. The vast mass of London itself, fought street by street, could easily devour an entire hostile army; and we would rather see London laid in ruins and ashes than that it should be tamely and abjectly enslaved.

We will have no truce or parlay with you Hitler, or the grisly gang who work your wicked will. You do your worst -- and we will do our best.

What shall I do with all my books?' was the question, and the answer, 'Read them,' sobered the questioner. But if you cannot read them, at the very least handle them and, as it were, fondle them. Peer into them. Let them fall open as they will. Read on from the first sentence that turns the eye. Then turn to another. Make a voyage of discovery, taking soundings of uncharted seas. Set them back on their shelves with your own hands. Arrange them on your own plan, so that if you do not know what is in them, you at least know where they are. If they cannot be your friends, let them at any rate be your acquaintances. If they cannot enter the circle of your life, do not deny them at least a nod of recognition.

We must all turn our backs upon the horrors of the past. We must look to the future. We cannot afford to drag forward cross the years that are to come the hatreds and revenges which have sprung from the injuries of the past.

We shall defend our island whatever the cost may be; we shall fight on beaches, landing grounds, in fields, in streets and on the hills. We shall never surrender and even if, which I do not for the moment believe, this island or a large part of it were subjugated and starving, then our empire beyond the seas, armed and guarded by the British Fleet, will carry on the struggle until in God?s good time the New World with all its power and might, sets forth to the liberation and rescue of the Old.

We, in short, propose to tax luxuries, monopolies, and superfluities, but we scrupulously avoid taxing the necessaries of life.

Author Picture
First Name
Winston
Last Name
Churchill, fully Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill
Birth Date
1874
Death Date
1965
Bio

British Conservative Politician, Statesman, Historian, Artist, Writer, Served twice as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Awarded Nobel Prize in Literature, Honorary Citizen of the United States, Commander of the 6th Battalion of the Royal Scots Fusiliers, Minister of Munitions, Secretary of State for War, First Lord of the Admiralty, Chancellor of the Exchequer