Yann Martel

Yann
Martel
1963

Spanish-born Canadian Author of Novel "Life of Pi"

Author Quotes

Why do people move? What makes them uproot and leave everything they've known for a great unknown beyond the horizon? Why climb this Mount Everest of formalities that makes you feel like a beggar? Why enter this jungle of foreignness where everything is new, strange and difficult? The answer is the same the world over: people move in the hope of a better life.

You must fight hard to shine the light of words upon it. Because if you don't, if your fear becomes a wordless darkness that you avoid, perhaps even manage to forget, you open yourself to further attacks of fear because you never truly fought the opponent who defeated you.

What is the purpose of reason, Richard Parker? Is it no more than to shine at practicalities - the getting of food, clothing and shelter? Why can't reason give greater answers? Why can we throw a question further than we can pull in an answer? Why such a vast net of there's so little fish to catch?

Why make dirty what is beautiful, spoil what is perfect? Love.

You must take life the way it comes at you and make the best of it.

What of God?s silence? I think it over. I add:

Why tolerate darkness? Everything is here and it is clear if we look with due attention.

You see these guinea pigs? Well... they're not dangerous.

We believe what we see...What do you do when you?re in the dark?

Whatever the reason for wanting to escape, sane or insane, zoo detractors should realize that animals don't escape to somewhere but from something. Something within their territory has frightened them - the intrusion of an enemy, the assault of a dominant animal, a startling noise - and set off a flight reaction.... Animals that escape go from the known into the unknown - and if there is one thing an animal hates above all else, it is the unknown.

Why would God undergo something? Why not leave death to the mortals? Why I had to mess that was beautiful, spoil perfection?

You see, the penis, it's so graceless, wouldn't you agree? When it's cold and shriveled up, it looks like W.H. Auden in his old age; when it's hot, it flops and dangles about in a ridiculous way; when it's excited, it looks so pained and earnest you'd think it was going to burst into tears. And the scrotum! To think that something so vital to the survival of the species, fully responsible for 50 per cent of the ingredients--though none of the work--should hang freely from the body in a tiny, defenseless bag of skin. One whack, one bite, one paw-scratch--and it's just the right level, too, for your average animal, a dog, a lion, a sabre-tooth tiger--and that's it, end of story. Don't you think it should get better protection? Behind some bone, for example, like us? What could be better than our nicely tapered entrance? It's discreet and stylish, everything is cleverly and compactly encased in the body, with nothing hanging out within easy reach of a closing subway door, there's a neat triangle of hair above it, like a road sign, should you lose your way--it's perfect. The penis is just such a lousy design. It's pre-Scandinavian. Pre-Bauhaus, even.

We commonly say in the trade that the most dangerous animal in a zoo is Man.

When animals fight, it is with the intent to kill and with the understanding that they may be killed.

Without a driver this bus is lost. Our lives are over. Come aboard if your destination is oblivion - it should be our next stop. We can sit together. You can have the window seat, if you want. But it's a sad view.

Zoo on the same absurd idea I have heard much about God and religion. Lots of well-wishing, but uninformed people believe that wild animals in the world are happy to live, because freedom is present. Will say this in front of a tall and burly body, handsome predators, say, a lion or leopard (or gnu because, hey, what is acceptable ?!). Imagine what kind of pounding and roaring of being moved in Savannah is a great beast - is trying to digest the victim, which is to obey whatever; Or imagine prey stubborn, energetic race - as he shaped to keep trying a lot after meals.

We fight and fight and fight. We fight no matter the cost of battle, the losses we take, the improbability of success. We fight to the very end. It's not a question of courage. It's something constitutional, an inability to let go. It may BE Nothing more Than Life-the stupidity of hungry.

When I corrected her, I told her that in fact she was not so wrong; that Hindus, in their capacity for love, are indeed hairless Christians, just as Muslims, in the way they see God in everything, are bearded Hindus, and Christians, in their devotion to God, are hat-wearing Muslims.

Without madness would no species can survive.

We fight no matter the cost of battle, the losses we take, the improbability of success. We fight to the very end. It is not the question of courage. It is something constitutional, an ability to let go. It maybe nothing more than life-hungry stupidity.

When the course of experience made me see that there is no savior and no special grace, no remission beyond the human, that pain is to be endured and fades, if it fades, only with time, then God became nothing to me but a dyslexic dog, with neither bark nor bite.

Words are cold, muddy toads trying to understand sprites dancing in a field-but they're all we have.

We must do the same with death in our lives: resolve it, give it meaning, put it into context, however hard that might be.

When we have much pain in his life, every new pain will just heavy but also meant nothing.

Yes! Practice-singular!' the wise men screamed in unison. Three index fingers, like punctuation marks, jumped to attention in the air to emphasize their point (Life of Pi 68).

First Name
Yann
Last Name
Martel
Birth Date
1963
Bio

Spanish-born Canadian Author of Novel "Life of Pi"