Conscience

Conscience is God’s deputy in the soul.

There may be some tenderness in the conscience and yet the will be a very stone; and as long as the will stands out, there is no broken heart.

The test of every religious, political, or educational system is the man which it forms. If it injures the intelligence, it is bad; if it injures the character, it is vicious; if it injures the conscience it is criminal.

Conscience is the dictate of reason.

A firm faith is the best theology; a good life is the best philosophy, a clear conscience the best law; honesty the best policy, and temperance the best physic.

So long as there are earnest believers in the world, they will always wish to punish opinions, even if their judgment tells them it is unwise, and their conscience that is wrong.

Conscience is the mirror of our souls, which represents the errors of our lives in their full shape.

Memory is the cabinet of imagination, the treasury of reason, the registry of conscience, and the council-chamber of thought.

A guilty conscience is a hell on earth, and points to one beyond.

In vain we attempt to clear our conscience by affecting to compensate for fraud or cruelty by acts of strict religious homage towards God.

It is a conscience very ill informed that violates the rights of one man, for the convenience of another.

Conscience is thoroughly well bred and soon leaves off talking to those who do not wish to hear it.

A quiet conscience makes one so serene!

Conviction is the conscience of the mind.

Contempt of all outward things that come in competition with duty fulfills the ideal of human greatness. It is sanctioned by conscience, that universal and eternal lawgiver, whose chief principle is, that everything must be yielded up for right.

Every human being has a work to carry on within, duties to perform abroad, influences to exert, which are peculiarly his, and which no conscience but his own can teach.

No evil is intolerable but a guilty conscience.

The only guide to a man is his conscience; the only shield to his memory is the rectitude and sincerity of his actions. It is very imprudent to walk through life without this shield, because we are often mocked by the failure of our hopes and the upsetting of our calculations; but with this shield, however the fates may play, we march always in the ranks of honour.

Conscience and covetousness are never to be reconciled; like fire and water they always destroy each other, according tot he predominancy of the element.

What can be more honorable than to have courage enough to execute the commands of reason and conscience, to maintain the dignity of our nature, and the station assigned us?