Envy

Upon every hand we meet with those who have some secret resentment that is ever being nurtured within their hearts. They resent the success, or happiness of some one whom they think is less deserving than they are. They resent the just recognition that comes to others from work and long effort to excel. Or, they may resent being born poor - or resent the fact that they were even born!... Strive to excel, strive to achieve, where others have failed, and you will find no space within your mind to lodge resentment. Resentment is the child of selfishness, foolish envy, and inactivity... Our life upon this earth is too valuable for resentment of any kind. There is so much to do, so much to learn - so little time in which to live and work it all out.

The essence of envy is a deep desire to be someone else. In its extreme form it is a complete nullification of oneself.

The will to power, as the modern age from Hobbes to Nietzsche understood it, far from being a characteristic of the strong, is, like envy and greed, among the vices of the weak, and possibly even their most dangerous one. Power corrupts indeed when the weak band together in order to ruin the strong, but not before.

Envy is hatred without a cure.

Emulation admires and strives to imitate great actions; envy is only moved to malice.

Emulation is not rivalry. Emulation is the child of ambition; rivalry is the unlovable daughter of envy.

Envy lurks at the bottom of the human heart, like a viper in its hole.

How can we explain the perpetuity of envy - a vice which yields no return?

Envy destroys peace of mind and happiness. An envious person’s life is full of suffering and resentment. He is never happy with what he himself has.

When we envy another, we make their virtue our vice.

Envy is but the smoke of low estate, ascending still against the fortunate.

If thou takes virtue for the rule of life, and valuest thyself upon acting in all things comfortably thereto, thou wilt have no cause to envy lords and princes; for blood is inherited, but virtue is common property and may be acquired by all; it has, moreover, an intrinsic worth, which blood has not.

Envy is such a part of many people’s personalities that it is not reasonable to expect them to completely eradicate this trait. Rather, they should channel it in a positive direction. Let them envy those with wisdom so they will try to gain more wisdom.

As a moth gnaws a garment, so doth envy consume a man.

Envy is a week that grows in all soils and climates, and is no less luxuriant in the country than in the court; is not confined to any rank of men or extent of fortune, but rages in the breasts of all degrees.

Nothing can allay the rage of biting envy.

Envy is an ill-natured vice, and is made up of meanness and malice. It wishes the force of goodness to be strained, and the measure of happiness abated. It laments over prosperity, and sickens at the sight of health. It oftentimes wants spirit as well as good nature.

Envy lies between two beings equal in nature, though unequal in circumstances.

Envy comes from focusing on the few moments of good fortune in the life of another person, while ignoring his years of misfortune.

By the very fact that I respect you without envy I prove my dignity as a man.