Familiarity

Too much familiarity breeds contempt.

It is a delightful thought that, during the familiarity of constant proximity, the heart gathers up in silence the nutriment of love, as the diamond, even beneath the water, imbibes the light it emits. Time, which deadens hatred, secretly strengthens love.

Admiration and familiarity are strangers.

There be four good mothers who have four bad daughters: Truth hath Hatred, Prosperity hath Pride, Security hath Peril, and Familiarity hath Contempt.

Familiarity breeds contentment.

Familiarity may breed contempt in some areas of human behavior, but in the field of social ideas it is the touchstone of acceptability.

It is familiarity with life that makes time speed quickly. When every day is a step in the unknown, as for children, the days are long with gathering of experience.

Familiarity in one's superiors causes bitterness, fir it may not be returned.

Nature I believe in. True art aims to represent men and women, not as my little self would have them, but as they appear. My heroes and heroines I want not extreme types, all good or all bad; but human, mortal—partly good, partly bad. Realism I need. Pure mental abstractions have no significance for me.

Familiarity breeds contempt.

Where nature is concerned, familiarity breeds love and knowledge, not contempt.

There can be no prestige without mystery, for familiarity breeds contempt.

Marriage must incessantly contend with a monster that devours everything: familiarity.

Familiarity makes even the most terrible things easy of approach.

Familiarity makes even the most terrible things easy of approach.

Familiarity makes even the most terrible things easy of approach.

Familiarity breeds acquiescence as well as contempt.

Growing familiarity has the deadly effect of enabling one to predict the other person's responses; and when that happens, the stimulating quality and creative tension of a relationship are finished.

Avoid familiarities in intercourse. Neither use them nor permit them. The stars keep their brilliance by not making themselves common. Every familiarity breeds contempt.

Our happiness, satisfaction, and our understanding, even of God, will be no deeper than our capacity to know ourselves inwardly, to encounter the outer world from the deep comfort that comes from being at home in one’s own skin, from an intimate familiarity with the ways of one’s own mind and body.