Genius

Gentleness in the gait is what simplicity is in the dress. Violent gesture or quick movement inspires involuntary disrespect. One looks for a moment at a cascade; but one sits for hours, lost in thought, and gazing upon the still water of a lake. A deliberate gait, gentle manners, and a gracious tone of voice - all of which may be acquired - give a mediocre man an immense advantage over those vastly superior to him. To be bodily tranquil, to speak little, and to digest without effort are absolutely necessary to grandeur of mind or of presence, or to proper development of genius.

Necessity is often the spur to genius.

As diamond cuts diamond, and one hone smoothes a second, all the parts of intellect are whetstones to each other; and genius, which is but the result of their mutual sharpening, is character, too.

Action, so to speak, is the genius of nature.

True great genius is always accompanied with good sense.

I have observed that vulgar readers almost always lose their veneration for the writings of the genius with whom they have had personal intercourse.

Genius is but a greater aptitude for patience.

Enthusiasm is the genius of sincerity, and truth accomplishes not victories without it.

Every man who observes vigilantly and resolves steadfastly grows unconsciously into genius.

Nothing is so contagious as enthusiasm; it moves stones, it charms brutes. Enthusiasm is the genius of sincerity and truth accomplishes no victories without it.

Fiction is no longer a mere amusement; but transcendent genius, accommodating itself to the character of the age, has seized upon this province of literature, and turned fiction from a toy into a mighty engine.

Nothing in the world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education alone will not; the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent.

Enthusiasm is that secret and harmonious spirit which hovers over the production of genius.

There is but one book for genius - nature.

Genius is one per cent inspiration and ninety-nine percent perspiration.

He who seldom speaks, and with one calm well-timed word can strike dumb the loquacious, is a genius or a hero.

The first virtue of all really great men is that they are sincere. They eradicate hypocrisy from their hearts. They bravely unveil their weaknesses, their doubts, their defects. They are courageous. They boldly ride a-tilt against prejudices. They love their fellow-men profoundly. They are generous. They allow their hearts to expand. They have compassion for all forms of suffering. Pity is the very foundation-stone of Genius.

Genius is nothing but a greater aptitude for patience.

Heroism is active genius; genius, contemplative heroism. Heroism is the self-devotion of genius manifesting itself in action.