Govern

Laws are to govern all alike - those opposed as well as those who favor them. I know of no method to repeal of bad or obnoxious laws so effective as their stringent execution.

He that is to govern a whole nation must read in himself, not this or that particular man; but mankind.

As the mind must govern the hands, so in every society the man of intelligence must direct the man of labor.

When the white man governs himself, that is self-government; but when he governs himself and also governs another man, that is despotism... No man is good enough to govern another man without that other's consent.

Every one may begin a war at his pleasure, but cannot so finish it. A prince, therefore, before engaging in any enterprise, should well measure his strength, and govern himself accordingly.

Show is not substance; realities govern wise men.

The greatest business of a man is to improve his mind and govern his manners; all other projects and pursuits, whether in our power to compass or not, are only amusements.

Every physician knows, though metaphysicians know little about it, that the laws which govern the animal machine are as certain and invariable as those which guide the planetary system, and are as little within the control of the human being who is subject to them.

The greater a man is in power above others, the more he ought to excel them in virtue. None ought to govern who is not better than the governed.

Custom and convention govern human activities.

The way to subject all things to thyself is to subject thyself to reason; thou shalt govern many, if reason govern thee. Wouldst thou be crowned the monarch of a little world? command thyself.

Syllables govern the world.

They who govern most make the least noise.

Men govern nothing with more difficulty than their tongues, and can moderate their desires more than their words.

Men would never be superstitious, if they could govern all their circumstances by set rules, or if they were always favored by fortune: but being frequently driven into straits where rules are useless, and being often kept fluctuating pitiably between hope and fear by the uncertainty of fortune’s greedily coveted favors, they are consequently, for the most part, very prone to credulity.

Surely human affairs would be far happier if the power of men to be silent were the same as that to speak. But experience more than sufficiently teaches that men govern nothing with more difficulty than their tongues, and can moderate their desires more easily than their words.

Despotism may govern without faith, but Liberty cannot.

Civilization consists in teaching men to govern themselves.

The heart commonly govern the head; and any strong passion, set the wrong way, will soon infatuate even the wisest of men; therefore the first part of wisdom is to watch the affections.

The essential problem is how to govern a large-scale world with small-scale minds.