Guilty

A guilty conscience is a hell on earth, and points to one beyond.

No evil is intolerable but a guilty conscience.

The guilty think all talk is of themselves.

When a miser contents himself with giving nothing, and saving what he has got, and is in others respects guilty of no injustice, he is, perhaps, of all bad men the least injurious to society; the evil he does is properly nothing more than the omission of the good he might do. If, of all the vices, avarice is the most generally detested, it is the effect of an avidity common to all men; it is because men hate those from whom they can expect nothing. The greedy misers rail at sordid misers.

When you descant on the faults of others, consider whether you be not guilty of the same. To gain knowledge of ourselves, the best way is to convert the imperfections of others into a mirror for discovering our own.

A man guilty of poverty easily believes himself suspected.

Guilt is a poor, helpless, dependent being. Without the alliance of able, diligent, and let me add, fortunate fraud, it is inevitably undone. If the guilty culprit be obstinately silent, it forms a deadly presumption against him; if he speaks, talking tends only to his discovery, and his very defense often furnishes the materials for his conviction.

"Every fault of the mind becomes more conspicuous and more guilty in proportion to the rank of the offender" - Persons in high station are not only answerable for their own conduct, but for the example they may hold out to others. This, joined to their advantages of education, aggravates their vices and loads them with a greater share of responsibility.

No guilty man is ever acquitted at the bar of his own conscience.

He who slayeth one man is as guilty as if he killed the whole human race. And he who saveth a soul accomplisheth a deed as meritorious as if he head saved all humanity.

Reason is God's gift, but so are the passions. Reason is as guilty as passion.

The highest of characters, in my estimation, is his who is as ready to pardon the moral errors of mankind as if he were every day guilty of some himself; and at the same time as cautious of committing a fault as if he never forgave one.

He who helps the guilty shares the crime.

The guilty fear the law, the guiltless Fortune.

A good conscience fears no witnesses, but a guilty conscience is solicitous even in solitude. If we do nothing but what is honest, let all the world know it; but if otherwise, what does it signify to have nobody else know it so long as I know it myself? Miserable is he who slights that witness!

Nobody becomes guilty by fate.

Was ever any wicked man free from the stings of a guilty conscience?

The guilty mind debases the great image that it wears and levels us with brutes.

He who puts a friend to public shame is as guilty as a murderer.

He that voluntarily continues in ignorance, is guilty of all the crimes which ignorance produces.