Indecision

Indecision and hesitation are the weakness of a careful nature always intent on the saving of face and losing it thereby.

More errors arise from inhibited indecision than from impulsive behavior.

Indecision is debilitating; it feeds upon itself; it is, one might almost say, habit-forming. Not only that, but it is contagious; it transmits itself to others.

There is no more miserable human being than one in whom nothing is habitual but indecision.

Idleness is ever the root of indecision.

Each indecision brings its own delays, and days are lost lamenting other days.

Decision is a sharp knife that cuts clean and straight; indecision, a dull one that hacks and tears and leaves ragged edges behind it.

War’s very object is victory, not prolonged indecision. In war there is no substitute for victory.

There is not more miserable human being than one in whom nothing is habitual but indecision.

Indecision is like a stepchild: if he does not wash his hands, he is called dirty, if he does, he is wasting water.

Indecision is like a stepchild: if he does not wash his hands, he is called dirty, if he does, he is wasting water.

Nothing is so exhausting as indecision, and nothing is so futile.

To be constantly changing one’s plans isn’t decision at all – it’s indecision.

A bulky staff implies a division of responsibility, slowness of action, and indecision; whereas a small staff implies activity and concentration of purpose.