Author

John
Ruskin
1819
1901

English Critic, Essayist, Social Reformer

Author Quotes

The greatest efforts of the race have always been traceable to the love of praise, as the greatest catastrophes to the love of pleasure.

The greatest thing a human soul ever does in this world is to see something.

The Divine mind is as visible in its full energy of operation on every lowly bank and mouldering stone as in the lifting of the pillars of heaven, and settling the foundation of the earth.

The enormous influence of novelty - the way in which it quickens observation, sharpens sensation, and exalts sentiment - is not half enough taken note of by us, and is to me a very sorrowful matter. And yet, if we try to obtain perpetual change, change itself will become monotonous.

The constant duty of every man to his fellows is to ascertain his own powers and special gifts, and to strengthen them for the help of others.

The distinguishing sign of slavery is to have a price, and be bought for it.

Superstition, in all times and among all nations, is the fear of a spirit whose passions are those of a man, whose acts are the acts of a man; who is present in some places, not in others; who makes some places holy and not others; who is kind to one person, unkind to another; who is pleased or angry according to the degree of attention you pay him, or praise you refuse him; who is hostile generally to human pleasure, but may be bribed by sacrifice of a part of that pleasure into permitting the rest. This, whatever form of faith it colors, is the essence of superstition.

Temperance, in the nobler sense, does not mean a subdued and imperfect energy; it does not mean a stopping short in any good thing, as in love or in faith; but it means the power which governs the most intense energy, and prevents its acting in any way but as it ought.

Remember always, in painting as in eloquence, the greater your strength, the quieter will be your manner, and the fewer your words; and in painting, as in all the arts and acts of life, the secret of high success will be found, not in a fretful and various excellence, but in a quiet singleness of justly chosen aim.

Obedience is, indeed, founded on a kind of freedom, else it would become mere subjugation, but that freedom is only granted that obedience may be more perfect; and thus while a measure of license is necessary to exhibit the individual energies of things, the fairness and pleasantness and perfection of them all consist in their restraint.

Of all the pulpits from which human voice is ever sent forth, there is none from which it reaches so far as from the grave.

No peace was ever won from fate by subterfuge or agreement; no peace is ever in store for any of us, but that which we shall win by victory over shame or sin - victory over the sin that oppresses, as well as over that which corrupts.

No peace was ever won from fate by subterfuge or argument; no peace is ever in store for any of us, but that which we shall win by victory over shame or sin - victory over the sin that oppresses, as well as over that which corrupts.

No divine terror will ever be found in the work of the man who wastes a colossal strength in elaborating toys; for the first lesson that terror is sent to teach us is, the value of the human soul, and the shortness of mortal time.

No human being, however great, or powerful, was ever so free as a fish.

Life being very short, and the quiet hours of it few, we ought to waste none of them in reading valueless books.

No day is without its innocent hope.

He only is advancing in life whose heart is getting softer, whose blood warmer, whose brain quicker, whose spirit is entering into living peace.

He who can take no interest in what is small will take false interest in what is great.

Great completion marks the progress of art, absolute completion usually its decline.

Happiness is everywhere, and its spring is in our own heart.

God intends no man to live in this world without working; but it seems to me no less evident that He intends every man to be happy in his work.

Great art is precisely that which never was, nor will be taught, it is pre-eminently and finally the expression of the spirits of great men.

Genius is only a superior power of seeing.

God gives us always strength enough and sense enough, for every thing he wants us to do.

First Name
John
Last Name
Ruskin
Birth Date
1819
Death Date
1901
Bio

English Critic, Essayist, Social Reformer