Edwin Paxton Hood

Edwin Paxton
Hood
1820
1885

English Non-Conformist Clergy and Author

Author Quotes

Be as careful of the books you read, as of the company you keep; for your habits and character will be as much influenced by the former as by the latter.

Of all the know-nothing persons in this world, commend us to the man who has "never known a day's illness." He is a moral dunce, one who has lost the greatest lesson of life; who has skipped the finest lecture in that great school of humanity, the sick-chamber.

The eyes of a man are of no use without the observing power. Telescopes and microscopes are cunning contrivances, but they cannot see of themselves.

There is not a string attuned to mirth but has its chord of melancholy.

Weeds grow sometimes very much like flowers, and you can't tell the difference between true and false merely by the shape.

What is mind? No matter. What is matter? Never mind. What is the soul? It is immaterial.

When we advance a little into life, we find that the tongue of man creates nearly all the mischief of the world.

We love the good old Bible,
The glorious Word of God,
The lamp for those who travel
O’er all life’s dreary road.
The watchword in life’s battle,
The chart on life’s dark sea;
The beautiful, dear Bible,
It shall our teacher be.

Who would not love the Bible,
So beautiful and wise?
Its teachings charm the simple,
And point us to the skies.
Its stories all so mighty
Of men so brave to see;
The beautiful, dear Bible,
It shall our teacher be.

But most we love the Bible,
For there we children learn
How Christ for us became a child,
Our hearts to Him to turn;
And how He bowed to sorrow,
That we His face might see,
The Bible, O the Bible,
It shall our teacher be.

Then we will hold the Bible,
The glorious book of God;
We’ll ne’er forsake the Bible
Through all life’s future road.
And when we lie adying,
Wherever that may be,
The beautiful, dear Bible,
Shall still our solace be.

God, who hath made the daisies,
And every lovely thing,
He will accept our praises,
And hearken while we sing;
Will say, though we are simple,
Though ignorant we be,
Suffer the little children,
And let them come to Me.

Though we are young and simple,
In praise we may be bold;
The children in the temple
He heard in days of old;
And if our hearts are humble,
He says to you and me,
Suffer the little children,
And let them come to Me.

He sees the bird that wingeth
Its way o’er earth and sky;
He hears the lark that singeth
Up in the heav’n so high;
He sees the heart’s low breathings,
And says (well pleased to see)
Suffer the little children,
And let them come to Me.

And of all the griefs that mortals share, the one that seems the hardest to bear is the grief without community.

Evil is wrought by want of thought as well as by want of heart.

What is mind? No matter. What is matter? Never mind. What is the soul? It is immaterial.

Be as careful of the books you read as the company you keep. Your habits and character will be as much influenced by the former as the latter.

Author Picture
First Name
Edwin Paxton
Last Name
Hood
Birth Date
1820
Death Date
1885
Bio

English Non-Conformist Clergy and Author