François de La Rochefoucauld, François VI, Duc de La Rochefoucauld, Prince de Marcillac, Francois A. F. Rochefoucauld-Liancourt

François de La
Rochefoucauld, François VI, Duc de La Rochefoucauld, Prince de Marcillac, Francois A. F. Rochefoucauld-Liancourt
1613
1680

French Courtier, Moralist, Writer of Maxims and Memoirs

Author Quotes

When a man seems to be wise, it is merely that his follies are proportionate to his age and fortune.

Women can less easily surmount their coquetry than their passions.

When not prompted by vanity, we say little.

Women find it far more difficult to overcome their inclination to coquetry than to overcome their love.

We may seem great in an employment below our worth, but we very often look little in one that is too big for us.

We rarely think people have good sense unless they agree with us.

Weakness is more opposed to virtue than is vice.

What men have called friendship is only a social arrangement, a mutual adjustment of interests, an interchange of services given and received; it is, in sum, simply a business from which those involved propose to derive a steady profit for their own self-love.

We may sooner be brought to love them that hate us, than them that love us more than we would have them do.

We say little if not egged on by vanity.

Weakness is the only fault that is incorrigible.

What often prevents our abandoning ourselves to a single vice is, our having more than one.

We must not judge of a man's merits by his great qualities, but by the use he makes of them.

We say little, when vanity does not make us speak.

Were we faultless, we would not derive such satisfaction from remarking the faults of others.

What seems generosity is often disguised ambition, that despises small to run after greater interests.

We need greater virtues to sustain good than evil fortune.

We seldom attribute common sense except to those who agree with us.

Were we perfectly acquainted with the object, we should never passionately desire it.

What seems to be generosity is often no more than disguised ambition, which overlooks a small interest in order to secure a great one.

We need not be much concerned about those faults which we have the courage to own.

We seldom find any person of good sense, except those who share our opinions.

Were we to take as much pains to be what we ought to be as we do to disguise what we really are, we might appear like ourselves without being at the trouble of any disguise at all.

What we call generosity is for the most part only the vanity of giving; and we exercise it because we are more fond of that vanity than of the thing we give.

We often believe we are constant under misfortunes when we are only dejected; and we suffer then without daring to look on them, like cowards who allow themselves to be killed through fear of defending themselves.

First Name
François de La
Last Name
Rochefoucauld, François VI, Duc de La Rochefoucauld, Prince de Marcillac, Francois A. F. Rochefoucauld-Liancourt
Birth Date
1613
Death Date
1680
Bio

French Courtier, Moralist, Writer of Maxims and Memoirs