Francis Atterbury

Francis
Atterbury
1662
1732

English Bishop

Author Quotes

A good character, when established, should not be rested in as an end, but only employed as a means of doing still farther good.

Luther deters me from solitariness; but he does not mean from a sober solitude that rallies our scattered strengths and prepares us against any new encounter from without.

A good man not only forbears those gratifications which are forbidden by reason and religion, but even restrains himself in unforbidden instances.

Make the true use of those afflictions which his hand, mercifully severe, hath been pleased to lay upon thee.

The works of nature will bear a thousand views and reviews: the more frequently and narrowly we look into them, the more occasion we shall have to admire their beauty.

Nothing can be reckoned good or bad to us in this life, any farther than it indisposes us for the enjoyments of another.

Those that place their hope in another world have, in a great measure, conquered dread of death, and unreasonable love of life.

The sacred function can never be hurt by their sayings, if not first reproached by our doings.

The smallest act of charity shall stand us in great stead.

What we employ in charitable uses during our lives is given away from ourselves: what we bequeath at our death is given from others only, as our nearest relations.

Our part is to choose out the most deserving objects, and the most likely to answer the ends of our charity, and, when this is done, all is done that lies in our power: the rest must be left to Providence.

Though it be not in our power to make affliction no affliction, yet it is in our power to take off the edge of it, by a steady view of those divine joys prepared for us in another state.

Affliction is a school of virtue; it corrects levity, and interrupts the confidence of sinning.

Few, without the hope of another life, would think it worth their while to live above the allurements of sense.

A good character when established should not be rested in as an end, but only employed as a means of doing still further good.

Affliction is a school of virtue: it corrects levity, and interrupts the confidence of sinning.

Few consider how much we are indebted to government, because few can represent how wretched mankind would be without it.

It is impossible to have a lively hope in another life, and yet be deeply immersed in the enjoyments of this.

Author Picture
First Name
Francis
Last Name
Atterbury
Birth Date
1662
Death Date
1732
Bio

English Bishop