Francis Bacon

Francis
Bacon
1561
1626

English Scientist, Author, Philosopher

Author Quotes

What is set down by order and division doth demonstrate that nothing is left out or omitted, but all is there.

Whether it be curiosity, or vain glory, or nature, Philanthropy is so fixed in my mind as it cannot be removed.

With a gentleman I am always a gentleman and a half, and with a fraud I try to be a fraud and a half.

What is truth? said jesting Pilate, and would not stay for an answer. But it is not only the difficulty and labor which men take in finding out of truth....that doth bring lies in favor but a natural, though corrupt love of the lie itself.

Who does not want to think is fanatic who can not think is an idiot who does not dare to think is a coward.

With regard to authority, it is the greatest weakness to attribute infinite credit to particular authors, and to refuse his own judgment to Time, the author of all authors, and therefore of all authority.

What then remains but that we still should cry not to be born, or, being born, to die?

Who questions much, shall learn much, and retain much.

With respect to this charge of bribery I am as innocent as any born upon St. Innocent's Day. I never had bribe or reward in my eye or thoughts when pronouncing sentence or order.

Whatever is new is unlooked for; and even it mends some, and impairs others: and he that is holpen takes it for a fortune, and he that is hurt for a wrong.

Who taught the parrot his "Welcome?" Who taught the raven in a drought to throw pebbles into a hollow tree where she espied water, that the water might rise so as she might come to it? Who taught the bee to sail through such a vast sea of air, and to find the way from a flower in a field to her hive? Who taught the ant to bite every grain of corn that she burieth in her hill, lest it should take root and grow?

Without friends the world is but a wilderness. There is no man that imparteth his joys to his friends, but he joyeth the more; and no man that imparteth his grieves to his friend, but he grieveth the less.

When a bee stings, she dies. She cannot sting and live. When men sting, their better selves die. Every sting kills a better instinct. Men must not turn bees and kill themselves in stinging others.

Who then to frail mortality shall trust but limns the water, or but writes in dust.

Without good-nature, man is but a better kind of vermin.

When a judge departs from the letter of the law he becomes a lawbreaker.

Whoever is out of patience is out of possession of their soul.

Women to govern men, slaves freemen, are much in the same degree; all being total violations and perversions of the laws of nature and nations.

When a man laughs at his troubles he loses a great many friends. They never forgive the loss of their prerogative.

Whoseoever is delighted in solitude, is either a wild beast or a god. Certain it is that the light that a man receiveth by counsel from another is drier and purer than that which cometh from his own understanding and judgment.

Wonder is the seed of knowledge

When any of the four pillars of government are mainly shaken or weakened--which are religion, justice, counsel and treasure--men need to pray for fair weather.

Whosoever hath his mind fraught with many thoughts, his wits and understanding do clarify and break up in communicating and discoursing with another: he tosseth his thoughts more easily; he marshalleth them more orderly: he seeth how they look when they are turned into words: finally, he waxeth wiser than himself; and that more by an hourÂ’s discourse than by a dayÂ’s meditation.

Words, as a Tartar's bow, do not shoot back upon the understanding of the wisest, and mightily entangle and pervert the judgment.

When children have been exposed, or taken away young, and afterwards have approached to their parentsÂ’ presence, the parents, though they have not known them, have had a secret joy, or other alteration, thereupon.

Author Picture
First Name
Francis
Last Name
Bacon
Birth Date
1561
Death Date
1626
Bio

English Scientist, Author, Philosopher