Frank Herbert, formally Franklin Patrick Herbert, Jr.

Frank
Herbert, formally Franklin Patrick Herbert, Jr.
1920
1986

American Science Fiction Writer, most notably the "Dune" series

Author Quotes

The person who takes the banal and ordinary and illuminates it in a new way can terrify. We do not want our ideas changed.

The thing the ecologically illiterate don't realize about an ecosystem is that it's a system. A system! A system maintains a certain fluid stability that can be destroyed by a misstep in just one niche.

The willow submits to the wind and prospers until one day it is many willows - a wall against the wind. This is the willow's purpose.

There is no real ending. It’s just the place where you stop the story.

There's an unwritten compact between you and the reader. If someone enters a bookstore and sets down hard earned money (energy) for your book, you owe that person some entertainment and as much more as you can give.

This group is composed of those for whom belief in saucers is tantamount to religion...They believe men from outer space will step in on Earth before it's too late, put a stop to the atomic bomb threat by their superior powers, and enforce perpetual peace for the good of the universe...

To know the future absolutely is to be trapped into that future absolutely. It collapses time. Present becomes future. I require more freedom than that.

Technology tends toward avoidance of risks by investors. Uncertainty is ruled out if possible. People generally prefer the predictable. Few recognize how destructive this can be, how it imposes severe limits on variability and thus makes whole populations fatally vulnerable to the shocking ways our universe can throw the dice.

The difference between sentiment and being sentimental is the following: Sentiment is when a driver swerves out of the way to avoid hitting a rabbit on the road. Being sentimental is when the same driver, when swerving away from the rabbit, hits a pedestrian.

The mind imposes this framework which it calls ‘reality.’ That arbitrary framework has a tendency to be quite independent of what your senses report.

The pitfall of Bene Gesserit training, she reminded herself, lay in the powers granted: such powers predisposed one to vanity and pride. But power deluded those who used it. One tended to believe power could overcome any barrier . . . including one's own ignorance.

The thing we must do intensely is be human together. People are more important than things. We must get together. The best thing humans can have going for them is each other. We have each other. We must reject everything which humiliates us. Humans are not objects of consumption. We must develop an absolute priority of humans ahead of profit — any humans ahead of any profit. Then we will survive.

The worst potential competition for any organism can come from its own kind. The species consumes necessities. Growth is limited by that necessity which is present in the least amount. The least favorable condition controls the rate of growth. (Law of the Minimum)

There is only one true wealth in all the universe--living time.

There's hope left in these dusty chords. There's a song left in our rusty hearts. We are torn and frayed but love remains.

This is the awe-inspiring universe of magic: There are no atoms, only waves and motions all around. Here, you discard all belief in barriers to understanding. You put aside understanding itself. This universe cannot be seen, cannot be heard, cannot be detected in any way by fixed perceptions. It is the ultimate void where no preordained screens occur upon which forms may be projected. You have only one awareness here the screen of the magi: Imagination Here, you learn what it is to be human. You are a creator of order, of beautiful shapes and systems, an organizer of chaos.

To ones not yet dead.

That is one of the Law's purposes, of course: to test the qualities of those who choose to employ it.

The failure of civilization can be detected by the gap between public and private morality. The wider the gap, the nearer the civilization to final dissolution

The mind of the believer stagnates. It fails to grow outward into an unlimited, infinite universe.

The power to destroy a thing is the absolute control over it.

The trouble with peace is that it tends to punish mistakes instead of rewarding brilliance.

Then, as his planet killed him, it occurred to Kynes that his father and all the other scientists were wrong, that the most persistent principles of the universe were accident and error.

There is probably no more terrible enlightenment than the one in which you discover your father is a man--with human flesh.

There's no secret to balance. You just have to feel the waves.

Author Picture
First Name
Frank
Last Name
Herbert, formally Franklin Patrick Herbert, Jr.
Birth Date
1920
Death Date
1986
Bio

American Science Fiction Writer, most notably the "Dune" series