Harriet Martineau

Harriet
Martineau
1802
1876

English Author, Social Theorist and Whig Writer

Author Quotes

But is it not the fact that religion emanates from the nature, from the moral state of the individual? Is it not therefore true that unless the nature be completely exercised, the moral state harmonized, the religion cannot be healthy?

Religion is a temper, not a pursuit.

Fidelity to conscience is inconsistent with retiring modesty. If it be so, let the modesty succumb. It can be only a false modesty which can be thus endangered.

School is no place of education for any children whatever till their minds are well put in action. This is the work which has to be done at home, and which may be done in all homes where the mother is a sensible woman.

For my own part, I had rather suffer any inconvenience from having to work occasionally in chambers and kitchen ... than witness the subservience in which the menial class is held in Europe.

Teaching and training children is to a few, a very few, a delightful employment notwithstanding its toils and cares. Except to these few it is irksome: and when accompanied with poverty and mortification intolerable.

Goodness and simplicity are indissolubly united. - The bad are the most sophisticated, all the world over, and the good the least.

The instruction furnished is not good enough for the youth of such a country… There is not even any systematic instruction given on political morals: an enormous deficiency in a republic.

I have no sympathy for those who, under any pressure of circumstances, sacrifice their heart's-love for legal prostitution.

Readers are plentiful: thinkers are rare.

You had better live your best and act your best and think your best today; for today is the sure preparation for tomorrow and all the other tomorrows that follow.

If a test of civilization be sought, none can be so sure as the condition of that half of society over which the other half has power.

A soul preoccupied with great ideas best performs small duties.

What office is there which involves more responsibility, which requires more qualifications, and which ought, therefore, to be more honorable, than that of teaching?

Must love be ever treated with profaneness as a mere illusion? or with coarseness as a mere impulse? or with fear as a mere disease? or with shame as a mere weakness? or with levity as a mere accident? whereas it is a great mystery and a great necessity, lying at the foundation of human existence, morality, and happiness - mysterious, universal, inevitable as death.

Author Picture
First Name
Harriet
Last Name
Martineau
Birth Date
1802
Death Date
1876
Bio

English Author, Social Theorist and Whig Writer