J. R. R. Tolkien, fully John Ronald Reuel Tolkien

J. R. R.
Tolkien, fully John Ronald Reuel Tolkien
1954
1973

English Writer, Fantasy Novelist, Poet, Philologist and University Profess best known for The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings and The Silmarillion

Author Quotes

Why O why did I ever leave my hobbithole?' said poor Mr. Baggins, bumping up and down on Bomburs back.

Yes, yes and i want to get unlost... As soon as possible!

You can trust us to stick to you through thick and thin ? to the bitter end. And you can trust us to keep any secret of yours ? closer than you yourself keep it. But you cannot trust us to let you face trouble alone, and go off without a word. We are your friends, Frodo. Anyway: there it is. We know most of what Gandalf has told you. We know a good deal about the ring. We are horribly afraid?but we are coming with you; or following you like hounds.

Your time will come. You will face the same Evil, and you will defeat it.

Why should a man be scorned if, finding himself in prison, he tries to get out and go home? Or if, when he cannot do so, he thinks and talks about other topics than jailers and prison-walls?

'Yes, yes my dear sir and I do know your name Mr. Bilbo Baggins. And you do know my name, though you don't remember that I belong to it. I am Gandalf, and Gandalf means me.

You cannot pass,' he said. The orcs stood still, and a dead silence fell. 'I am a servant of the Secret Fire, wielder of the flame of Anor. You cannot pass. The dark fire will not avail you, flame of Udun. Go back to the Shadow You cannot pass.

Why was I chosen?' 'Such questions cannot be answered,' said Gandalf. 'You may be sure that it was not for any merit that others do not possess. But you have been chosen, and you must therefore use such strength and heart and wits as you have.

Yes, yes we could. Spoiling nice fish, scorching it. Give me fish now, and keep nasty chips!

You certainly usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something you were after.

Why, Sam, he said, to hear you somehow makes me as merry as if the story was already written. But you?ve left out one of the chief characters; Samwise the stout hearted. ?I want to hear more about Sam, dad. Why didn?t they put in more of his talk, dad? That?s what I like, it makes me laugh. And Frodo wouldn?t have got far without Sam, would he, dad?? Now, Mr. Frodo, said Sam, you shouldn?t make fun. I was serious. So was I, said Frodo, and so I am. We?re going on a bit too fast. You and I, Sam, are still stuck in the worst places of the story, and it is all too likely that some will say at this point ?Shut the book now, dad; we don?t want to read any more?. Maybe, said Sam, but I wouldn?t be one to say that. Things done and over and made into part of the great tales are different. Why, even Gollum might be good in a tale, better than he is to have by you, anyway. And he used to like tales himself once, by his own account. I wonder if he thinks he?s the hero or the villain? Gollum! he called. Would you like to be the hero, now where?s he got to again?

Yet at the last Beren was slain by the Wolf that came from the gates of Angband, and he died in the arms of Tinviel. But she chose mortality, and to die from the world, so that she might follow him; and it is sung that they met again beyond the Sundering Seas, and after a brief time walking alive once more in the green woods, together they passed, long ago, beyond the confines of this world. So it is that Lthien Tinviel alone of the Elfkindred has died indeed and left the world, and they have lost her whom they most loved.

You have nice manners for a thief and a liar, said the dragon.

Why? Why do the fools fly?' said Denethor. 'Better to burn sooner than late, for burn we must. Go back to your bonfire! And I? I will go now to my pyre. To my pyre! No tomb for Denethor and Faramir. No tomb! No long slow sleep of death embalmed. We will burn like heathen kings before ever a ship sailed hither from the West. The West has failed. Go back and burn!

Yet dawn is ever the hope of men.

You may not like my burglar, but please don't damage him.

Wise men speak only of what they know.

Yet Frodo began to hear, or to imagine that he heard, something else: like the faint fall of soft bare feet. It was never loud enough, or near enough, for him to feel certain that he heard it; but once it had started it never stopped, while the Company was moving. But it was not an echo, for when they halted it pattered on for a little all by itself, and then grew still.

You must understand, young Hobbit, it takes a long time to say anything in Old Entish. And we never say anything unless it is worth taking a long time to say.

With a suddenness that startled them all the wizard sprang to his feet. He was laughing! I have it! he cried. Of course, of course! Absurdly simple, like most riddles when you see the answer. Picking up his staff he stood before the rock and said in a clear voice: Mellon! The star shone out briefly and faded again. Then silently a great doorway was outlined, though not a crack or joint had been visible before. Slowly it divided in the middle and swung outwards inch by inch, until both doors lay back against the wall.

Yet in doubt a man of worth will trust to his own wisdom.

You ought not to be rude to an eagle, when you are only the size of a hobbit, and are up in hid eyrie at night!

With regard to fairy stories, I feel that it is more interesting, and also in its way more difficult, to consider what they are, what they have become for us, and what values the long alchemic processes of time have produced in them. In Dasent's words I would say: 'We must be satisfied with the soup that is set before us, and not desire to see the bones of the ox out of which it has been boiled.'

Yet seldom do they fail of their seed, And that will lie in the dust and rot to spring up again in times and places unlooked-for. The deeds of Men will outlast us.

You renounce your friendship even in the hour of our need ' he said. 'Yet you were glad indeed to receive our aid when you came at last to these shores fainthearted loiterers and well-nigh emptyhanded. In huts on the beaches would you be dwelling still had not the Noldor carved out your haven and toiled upon your walls.

Author Picture
First Name
J. R. R.
Last Name
Tolkien, fully John Ronald Reuel Tolkien
Birth Date
1954
Death Date
1973
Bio

English Writer, Fantasy Novelist, Poet, Philologist and University Profess best known for The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings and The Silmarillion