Lewis Carroll, pseudonym for Charles Lutwidge Dodgson

Lewis
Carroll, pseudonym for Charles Lutwidge Dodgson
1832
1898

English Author, Mathematician, Logician, Anglican Deacon and Photographer. Best known for Alice's Adventures In Wonderland and sequel Through the Looking Glass

Author Quotes

When you have written a letter that you feel may possibly irritate your friend, however necessary you may have felt it to so express yourself, put it aside till the next day. Then read it over again, and fancy it addressed to yourself. This will often lead to your writing it all over again, taking out a lot of the vinegar and pepper, and putting in honey instead, and thus making a muchmore palatable dish of it!

A Postscript is a very useful invention: but it is not meant... to contain the real gist of the letter: it serves rather to throw into the shade any little matter we do not wish to make a fuss about.

Don?t repeat yourself. When once you have said your say, fully and clearly, on a certain point, and have failed to convince your friend, drop that subject: to repeat your arguments, all over again, will simply lead to his doing the same; and so you will go on, like a Circulating Decimal. Did you ever know a Circulating Decimal come to an end?

Don?t try to have the last word! How many a controversy would be nipped in the bud, if each was anxious to let the other have the last word! Never mind how telling a rejoinder you leave unuttered: never mind your friend?s supposing that you are silent from lack of anything to say: let the thing drop, as soon as it is possible without discourtesy: remember "speech is silvern, but silence is golden"!

If doubtful whether to end with "yours faithfully," or "yours truly," or "yours most truly," &c. (there are at least a dozen varieties, before you reach "yours affectionately"), refer to your correspondent?s last letter, and make your winding-up at least as friendly as his; in fact, even if a shade more friendly, it will do no harm!

If it should ever occur to you to write, jestingly, in dispraise of your friend, be sure you exaggerate enough to make the jesting obvious: a word spoken in jest, but taken as earnest, may lead to very serious consequences. I have known it to lead to the breaking-off of a friendship.

If the Letter is to be in answer to another, begin by getting out that other letter and reading it through, in order to refresh your memory, as to what it is you have to answer... A great deal of the bad writing in the world comes simply from writing too quickly.

If your friend makes a severe remark, either leave it unnoticed, or make your reply distinctly less severe: and if he makes a friendly remark, tending towards "making up" the little difference that has arisen between you, let your reply be distinctly more friendly. If, in picking a quarrel, each party declined to go more than three-eighths of the way, and if, in making friends, each was ready to go five-eighths of the way ? why, there would be more reconciliations than quarrels!

Since I have possessed a ?Wonderland Stamp Case?, Life has been bright and peaceful, and I have used no other. I believe the Queen?s laundress uses no other.

Twinkle, twinkle little bat How I wonder what you're at! Up above the world you fly, Like a tea-tray in the sky.

Went to the new Church both morning and afternoon, and read service in the afternoon. I got through it all with great success, till I came to read out the first verse of the hymn before the sermon, where the two words ?strife strengthened,? coming together, were too much for me, and I had to leave the verse unfinished.

When I used to read fairy-tales, I fancied that kind of thing never happened, and now here I am in the middle of one!

Why, sometimes I've believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.

You should learn not to make personal remarks,' Alice said with some severity; 'it's very rude.' The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, 'Why is a raven like a writing-desk?' 'Come, we shall have some fun now!' thought Alice. 'I'm glad they've begun asking riddles. ? I believe I can guess that,' she added aloud. 'Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?' said the March Hare. 'Exactly so,' said Alice. 'Then you should say what you mean,' the March Hare went on. 'I do,' Alice hastily replied; 'at least ? at least I mean what I say ? that's the same thing, you know.' 'Not the same thing a bit!' said the Hatter. 'You might just as well say that I see what I eat is the same thing as I eat what I see!' 'You might just as well say,' added the March Hare, 'that I like what I get is the same thing as I get what I like!' 'You might just as well say,' added the Dormouse, who seemed to be talking in his sleep, 'that I breathe when I sleep is the same thing as I sleep when I breathe!' 'It is the same thing with you,' said the Hatter, and here the conversation dropped, and the party sat silent for a minute, while Alice thought over all she could remember about ravens and writing-desks, which wasn't much.

Usually they are expensive to spend without realizing it.

We're all mad here. I?m mad. You're mad

When I was your age, I always did it for half an hour a day. Why, sometimes, I've believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.

Will you walk a little faster?' said a whiting to a snail, 'there's a porpoise close behind us and he's treading on my tail. See how eagerly the lobsters and the turtles all advance! They are waiting on the shingle -- will you come and join the dance? Will you, won't you, will you, won't you, will you join the dance?

You used to be much more...muchier. You've lost your muchness.

Was I the same when I got up this morning? I almost think I can remember feeling a little different. But if I am not the same, the next question is ?Who in the world am I? ?

What a funny watch!? she remarked. ?It tells the day of the month, and doesn?t tell what o?clock it is!? ?Why should it?? muttered the Hatter. ?Does YOUR watch tell you what year it is?? ?Of course not,? Alice replied very readily: ?but that?s because it stays the same year for such a long time together.? ?Which is just the case with MINE,? said the Hatter.

When I?m a Duchess, she said to herself (not in a very hopeful tone though), I won?t have any pepper in my kitchen at all. Soup does very well without. Maybe it?s always pepper that makes people hot-tempered, she went on, very much pleased at having found out a new kind of rule, and vinegar that makes them sour?and chamomile that makes them bitter?and?and barley-sugar and such things that make children sweet-tempered. I only wish people knew that; then they wouldn?t be so stingy about it, you know?

Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?' 'That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,' said the Cat. 'I don't much care where --' said Alice. 'Then it doesn't matter which way you go,' said the Cat. '--so long as I get somewhere,' Alice added as an explanation.

You won't make yourself a bit realer by crying.

We are but older children, dear, who fret to find our bedtime near.

Author Picture
First Name
Lewis
Last Name
Carroll, pseudonym for Charles Lutwidge Dodgson
Birth Date
1832
Death Date
1898
Bio

English Author, Mathematician, Logician, Anglican Deacon and Photographer. Best known for Alice's Adventures In Wonderland and sequel Through the Looking Glass