Author 193315

Lydia Maria
Child
1802
1880

American Abolitionist, Women's Rights and Indian Rights Activist, Journalist and Unitarian

Author Quotes

Not in vain is Ireland pouring itself all over the earth. Divine Providence has a mission for her children to fulfill; though a mission unrecognized by political economists. There is ever a moral balance preserved in the universe, like the vibrations of the pendulum. The Irish, with their glowing hearts and reverent credulity, are needed in this cold age of intellect and skepticism.

Genius hath electric power which earth can never tame, bright suns may scorch and dark clouds lower, its flash is still the same.

Home -- that blessed word, which opens to the human heart the most perfect glimpse of Heaven, and helps to carry it thither, as on an angel's wings.

Home - that blessed word, which opens to the human heart the most perfect glimpse of Heaven, and helps to carry it thither, as on an angel's wings.

How the universal heart of man blesses flowers! They are wreathed round the cradle, the marriage altar, and the tomb.

A comfortable old age is the reward of a well-spent youth. Instead of its bringing sad and melancholy prospects of decay, it would give us hopes of eternal youth in a better world.

I reduce the argument to very simple elements. I pay taxes for property of my own earning and saving, and I do not believe in taxation without representation. As for representation by proxy, that savors too much of the plantation system, however kind the master may be. I am a human being, and every human being has a right to a voice in the laws which claim authority to tax him, to imprison him, or to hang him. (1896)

A reformer is one who sets forth cheerfully toward sure defeat.

I thank my Heavenly Father for every manifestation of human love, I thank Him for all experiences, be they sweet or bitter, which help me to forgive all things, and to enfold the whole world with a blessing.

All who strive to live for something beyond mere selfish aims find their capacities for doing good very inadequate to their aspirations. They do so much less than they want to do, and so much less than they, at the outset, expected to do, that their lives, viewed retrospectively, inevitably look like failure.

I was gravely warned by some of my female acquaintances that no woman could expect to be regarded as a lady after she had written a book.

And genius hath electric power, which earth can never tame; bright suns may scorch, and dark clouds lower-- its flash is still the same.

I will work in my own way, according to the light that is in me.

Blessed indeed is the man who hears many gentle voices call him father!

In thy silent wishing, thy voiceless, unuttered prayer, let the desire be not cherished that afflictions may not visit thee; for well has it been said, "Such prayers never seem to have wings. I am willing to be purified through sorrow, and to accept it meekly as a blessing. I see that all the clouds are angels' faces, and their voices speak harmoniously of the everlasting chime."

But men never violate the laws of God without suffering the consequences, sooner or later.

It is impossible to exaggerate the evil work theology has done in the world.

Childhood itself is scarcely more lovely than a cheerful, kindly, sunshiny old age.

It is my mission to help in the breaking down of classes, and to make all men feel as if they were brethren of the same family, sharing the same rights, the same capabilities, and the same responsibilities. While my hand can hold a pen, I will use it to this end; and while my brain can earn a dollar, I will devote it to this end.

England may as well dam up the waters of the Nile with bulrushes as to fetter the step of Freedom, more proud and firm in this youthful land than where she treads the sequestered glens of Scotland, or couches herself among the magnificent mountains of Switzerland.

Misfortune is never mournful to the soul that accepts it; for such do always see that every cloud is an angel?s face. Every man deems that he has precisely the trials and temptations which are the hardest of all others for him to bear; but they are so, simply because they are the very ones he most needs.

Every human being has, like Socrates, an attendant spirit; and wise are they who obey its signals. If it does not always tell us what to do, it always cautions us what not to do.

Nature made us individuals, as she did the flowers and the pebbles; but we are afraid to be peculiar, and so our society resembles a bag of marbles, or a string of mold candles. Why should we all dress after the same fashion? The frost never paints my windows twice alike.

Whatever is highest and holiest is tinged with melancholy. The eye of genius has always a plaintive expression, and its natural language is pathos.

Author Picture
First Name
Lydia Maria
Last Name
Child
Birth Date
1802
Death Date
1880
Bio

American Abolitionist, Women's Rights and Indian Rights Activist, Journalist and Unitarian