O. Hobart Mowrer, fully Orval Hobart Mowrer

O. Hobart
Mowrer, fully Orval Hobart Mowrer
1907
1982

American-born Psychologist and Professor of Psychology at the University of Illinois

Author Quotes

If I can read the signs of our time aright, one of the great tasks which confronts us in our quest for peace of mind and more meaningful existence is the rediscovery of ethics. For historical reasons... morality and personal responsibility have become unfashionable.

By denying the reality of sin, we have, in effect, lost our way as human beings and how find ourselves groping in the dark for a definition of the meaning of life.

For several decades we psychologists looked upon the whole matter of sin and moral accountability as a great incubus and acclaimed our liberation from it as epoch making. But at length we have discovered that to be free in this sense, that is, to have the excuse of being sick rather than sinful, is to court the danger of also becoming lost… In becoming amoral, ethically neutral and free, we have cut the very roots of our being, lost our deepest sense of selfhood and identity, and with neurotics, themselves, we find ourselves asking: Who am I, what is my deepest destiny, what does living mean?

Is there no such thing as moral responsibility and social accountability at all? Is every mean or vicious thing that you or I as ordinary individuals do, not sin, but rather as expression of “illness”? Who would seriously hold that a society could long endure which consistently subscribed to this flaccid doctrine?

Author Picture
First Name
O. Hobart
Last Name
Mowrer, fully Orval Hobart Mowrer
Birth Date
1907
Death Date
1982
Bio

American-born Psychologist and Professor of Psychology at the University of Illinois