Oliver Cromwell

Oliver
Cromwell
1599
1658

English Puritan Leader, Lord Protector of the Realm, Statesman and General

Author Quotes

You have sat too long for any good you have been doing lately... Depart, I say; and let us have done with you. In the name of God, go!

That slovenly fellow which you see before us, who hath no ornament in his speech; I say that sloven, if we should ever come to have a breech with the King (which God forbid) in such case will be one of the greatest men of England.

Truly, though kingship be not a title but a name of office that runs through the law, yet it is not so ratione nominis, but from what is signified. It is a name of office, plainly implying a Supreme Authority. Is it more, or can it be stretched to more? I say, it is a name of office, plainly implying the Supreme Authority, and if it be so, why then I would suppose, (I am not peremptory in any thing that is matter of deduction or inference of my own,) why then I should suppose that whatsoever name hath been or shall be the name, in which the Supreme Authority shall act; why, (I say) if it had been those four or five letters, or whatsoever else it had been, that signification goes to the thing. Certainly it does, and not to the name. Why then, there can be no more said, but this, why this hath been fixt, so it may have been unfixt.

Your pretended fear lest error should step in, is like the man that would keep all the wine out of the country lest men should be drunk. It will be found an unjust and unwise jealousy, to deny a man the liberty he hath by nature upon a supposition that he may abuse it.

That which brought me into the capacity I now stand in, was the Petition and Advice given me by you, who, in reference to the ancient Constitution, did draw me here to accept the place of Protector. There is not a man living can say I sought it, no not a man, nor woman, treading upon English ground.

Trust in God, but keep your powder dry.

The commonest charge against Cromwell is hypocrisy ? and the commonest basis for that is defective chronology.

Vote it as you please; there is a company of poor men that will spend all their blood before they see it settled so.

The Commonwealth of England, Scotland and Ireland and of the Dominions thereunto belonging, shall be and reside in one person, and the people assembled in parliament; the style of which person shall be "The Lord Protector of the Commonwealth"... That Oliver Cromwell, Captain General of the forces of England, Scotland and Ireland, shall be, and is hereby declared to be, Lord Protector...for his life.

We are Englishmen; that is one good fact.

As to your own person the title of King would be of no advantage, because you have the full Kingly power in you already... I apprehend indeed, less envy and danger, and pomp, but not less power, and real opportunities of doing good in your being General than would be if you had assumed the title of King.

His body was wel compact and strong, his stature under 6 foote ( I beleeve about two inches) his head so shaped, as you might see it a storehouse and shop both of vast tresury of natural parts. His temper exceeding fyery as I have known, but the flame of it kept downe, for the most part, or soon allayed with those moral endowments he had. He was naturally compassionate towards objects in distresse, even to an effeminate measure; though God had made him a heart, wherein was left little roume for any feare, but what was due to himselfe, of which there was a large proportion, yet did he exceed in tenderness towards suffrerers. A larger soule, I thinke, hath seldom dwelt in a house of clay than his was.

I would have been glad to have lived under my wood side, and to have kept a flock of sheep, rather than to have undertaken this government.

Oliver Cromwell had certainly this afflatus. One that I knew was at the battle of Dunbar, told me that Oliver was carried on with a Divine impulse; he did laugh so excessively as if he had been drunk; his eyes sparkled with spirits. He obtain?d a great victory; but the action was said to be contrary to human prudence. The same fit of laughter seized Oliver Cromwell just before the battle of Naseby; as a kinsman of mine, and a great favourite of his, Colonel J. P. then present, testified. Cardinal Mazerine said, that he was a lucky fool.

At dinner we talked much of Cromwell, all saying he was a brave fellow and did owe his crown he got to himself, as much as any man that ever got one.

His character does not appear more extraordinary and unusual by the mixture of so much absurdity with so much penetration, than by his tempering such violent ambition, and such enraged fanaticism with so much regard to justice and humanity.

If the remonstrance had been rejected i would have sold all i had the next morning and never have seen England more, and i know there are many other modest men of the same resolution.

On becoming soldiers we have not ceased to be citizens.

Cromwell was a man in whom ambition had not wholly suppressed, but only suspended, the sentiments of religion.

His grandeur he deriv?d from heaven alone, for he was great e?er fortune made him so and wars like mists that rise against the sun made him but greater seem, not greater grow. No borrow?d bays his temple did adorn, but to our Crown he did fresh jewels bring; nor was his virtue poison?d soon as born, with the too early thoughts of being King.

If we do not depart from God, and disunite by that departure, and fall into disunion among ourselves, I am confident, we doing our duty and waiting upon the Lord, we shall find He will be as a wall of brass round about us till we have finished that work which he has for us to do.

One never rises so high as when one does not know where one is going.

Cromwell, our chief of men, who through a cloud, not of war only, but detractions rude, by faith and matchless fortitude, to peace and truth thy glorious way has ploughed and on the neck of crowned fortune proud has reared God?s trophies, and his work pursued, while Darwen stream with blood of Scots imbrued, and Dunbar field resounds thy praises loud, and Worcester?s laureate wreath. Yet much remains to conquer still; peace hath her victories No less renowned than war: new foes arise, Threatening to bind our souls with secular chains: Help us to save free conscience from the paw of hireling wolves whose gospel is their maw.

I am neither heir nor executor to Charles Stuart.

In a word, as he was guilty of many crimes against which Damnation is denounced, and for which hell-fire is prepared, so he had some good qualities which have caused the memory of some men in all Ages to be celebrated; and he will be look?d upon by posterity as a brave bad man.

Author Picture
First Name
Oliver
Last Name
Cromwell
Birth Date
1599
Death Date
1658
Bio

English Puritan Leader, Lord Protector of the Realm, Statesman and General