Patañjali

Patañjali
240 B.C.
180 B.C.

Indian Philosopher and Compiler of Yoga Sūtras and the Mahābhāṣya, Patañjali is a Sanskrit proper name. Several important Sanskrit works are ascribed to one or more authors of this name, and a great deal of scholarship has been devoted over the last century or so to the issue of disambiguation

Author Quotes

Thence, instantaneous cognition without the use of any vehicle and complete mastery over Pradhana.

These constitute seeded contemplations.

This practice becomes well-grounded when continued with reverent devotion and without interruption over a long period of time.

Unbroken continuation of that mental ability is meditation.

When that exists, control of incoming and outgoing energies is next.

The substratum is that in which the properties - latent, active or unmanifest - inhere.

The word Yoga means Union, from the same Sanskrit root as the Greek word Zeugma, the Latin word Jugum, and the English word yoke. (Yeung: to join)

Thence, the attainment of Animan etc., perfection of the body and the non-obstruction of its functions (of the body) by the powers (of the elements).

These five willing abstentions are not limited by rank, place, time or circumstance and constitute the Great Vow.

This spontaneous enlightenment results in intuitional perception of hearing, touching, seeing and smelling.

Uninterrupted flow (of the mind) towards the object (chosen for meditation) is contemplation.

When the agitations of the mind are under control, the mind becomes like a transparent crystal and has the power of becoming whatever form is presented. knower, act of knowing, or what is known.

The subtle Klesas are forsaken (i.e. destroyed) by the cessation of productivity (i.e. disappearance) of the mind.

The Yoga system of Patanjali is known as the Eightfold Path. 1. Yama (moral conduct), - Yama is fulfilled by noninjury to others, truthfulness, nonstealing, continence, and non-covetousness. 2. Niyama (religious observances). The niyama prescripts are purity of body and mind, contentment in all circumstances, self-discipline, self-study (contemplation), and devotion to God and guru. 3. Asana (right posture); the spinal column must be held straight, and the body firm in a comfortable position for meditation; 4. Pranayama (control of prana, subtle life currents); and 5. Pratyahara (withdrawal of the senses from external objects). The last steps are forms of yoga proper: 6. Dharana (concentration), holding the mind to one thought; 7. Dhyana (meditation); and 8. Samadhi (superconscious experience). This Eightfold Path of Yoga leads to the final goal of Kaivalya (Absoluteness), in which the yogi realizes the Truth beyond all intellectual apprehension. [paraphrased]

There are innumerable tricks that you might try to match the active thought of controlling minute muscular movement against the passive thought of easing the irritation and disturbance: roll the tongue back towards the uvula, at the same time let the eyes converge towards an imaginary point in the center of your forehead. The advantage is simply that your attention is forced to maintain the awkward position. You become aware sooner than you otherwise would of any relaxation; and you thereby show the rest of the body that it is no use trying to disturb you by its irritability.

These patterns when subtle may be removed by developing their contraries.

Though variegated by innumerable tendencies, the mind acts not for itself but for another, for the mind is of compound substance.

Union is restraining the thought-streams natural to the mind.

When the attributes cease mutative association with awarenessness, they resolve into dormancy in Nature, and the indweller shines forth as pure consciousness. This is absolute freedom.

The success of Yogis differs according as the means they adopt are mild, medium, or intense.

Their active afflictions are to be destroyed by meditation.

There being difference of interest, one mind is the director of many minds.

These thought-streams are controlled by practice and non-attachment.

Through destruction of impurities, practice of austerities brings about perfection of the body and the organs.

Vows of self-restraint comprise abstention from violence, falsehood, theft, incontinence and acquisitiveness.

Author Picture
First Name
Patañjali
Birth Date
240 B.C.
Death Date
180 B.C.
Bio

Indian Philosopher and Compiler of Yoga Sūtras and the Mahābhāṣya, Patañjali is a Sanskrit proper name. Several important Sanskrit works are ascribed to one or more authors of this name, and a great deal of scholarship has been devoted over the last century or so to the issue of disambiguation