Patañjali

Patañjali
240 B.C.
180 B.C.

Indian Philosopher and Compiler of Yoga Sūtras and the Mahābhāṣya, Patañjali is a Sanskrit proper name. Several important Sanskrit works are ascribed to one or more authors of this name, and a great deal of scholarship has been devoted over the last century or so to the issue of disambiguation

Author Quotes

When the bonds of the mind caused by action have been loosened, one may enter the body of another by knowledge of how the nerve-currents function.

The succession of these changes in that entity is the cause of its modification.

Their active modifications are destroyed by meditation.

There is another meditation which is attained by the practice of alert mental suspension until only subtle impressions remain.

These yogangas, or limbs of yoga, have come to be known as Patanjali's Eightfold Path of Yoga. They are enumerated in his Yoga Sutras, II:29: Yama (moral conduct, the avoidance of immoral actions); niyama (religious observances); asana (right posture for bodily and mental control); pranayama (control of prana or life force); pratyahara (interiorization of the mind); dharana (concentration); dhyana (meditation); and samadhi (divine union). [paraphrased]

Through sanctification and the removal of impurities, there arise special powers in the body and senses.

We can meditate on anything that our heart desires. The important thing is not what we meditate on, but more that we meditate. And then gradually to meditate more and more on what corresponds to the innermost longing of our heart. The practice of meditation... gradually works its magic in stilling the mind.

The thought-streams are five-fold, painful and not painful.

Their active modifications are to be suppressed by meditation.

There is further distinction on account of the mild, moderate or intense means employed.

These, the subtle ones, can be reduced by resolving them backward into their origin.

Through serene or luminous (states experienced within).

We want to be steady and easy. The conditions to be desired in the posture are to be properly balanced. It is necessary, in order to hold a position, to pay attention to it. You are going to become conscious of your body in ways which you are not conscious if you are engaged in some absorbing mental pursuit, or even in some purely physical activity, such as running.

The three appearing together are self-control.

Their suppression (is brought about) by persistent practice and non-attachment.

There is knowledge of everything from intuition.

They (stages corresponding to subtle objects) constitute only Samadhi with `seed'.

Through the practice of the different accessories to Yoga, on the destruction of impurity, arises spiritual illumination which develops into awareness of Reality.

What we most love is not what we know, but what knows us and draws us.

The three are internal in relation to the preceding ones.

Then follows supreme mastery over the senses.

There is no beginning of them, the desire to live being eternal.

They are obstacles in the way of Samadhi and powers when the mind is outward-turned.

Through variegated by innumerable Vasanas it (the mind) acts for another (Purusa) for it acts in association.

When consciousness is silent, the seer (atma) radiates in his own grandeur.

Author Picture
First Name
Patañjali
Birth Date
240 B.C.
Death Date
180 B.C.
Bio

Indian Philosopher and Compiler of Yoga Sūtras and the Mahābhāṣya, Patañjali is a Sanskrit proper name. Several important Sanskrit works are ascribed to one or more authors of this name, and a great deal of scholarship has been devoted over the last century or so to the issue of disambiguation