Patañjali

Patañjali
240 B.C.
180 B.C.

Indian Philosopher and Compiler of Yoga Sūtras and the Mahābhāṣya, Patañjali is a Sanskrit proper name. Several important Sanskrit works are ascribed to one or more authors of this name, and a great deal of scholarship has been devoted over the last century or so to the issue of disambiguation

Author Quotes

The three are more efficacious than the restraints.

Then the awareness begins to discriminate, and gravitates towards liberation.

There is the relation of cause and effect even though separated by class, locality and time because memory and impressions are the same in form.

They are right knowledge, wrong knowledge, fancy, sleep, and memory.

Thus the mind becomes fit for concentration.

When disturbed by negative thoughts, opposite [positive] ones should be thought of. This is pratipaksha bhavana.

The sequence of mutation occurs in every second, yet is comprehensible only at the end of a series.

The three Gunas having fulfilled their object the process of change (in the Gunas) comes to an end.

Then the seer dwells in his own nature.

There should be avoidance of pleasure or pride on being invited by the super-physical entities in charge of various places because there is the possibility of the revival of evil.

They have joy or sorrow for their fruit according as their cause is virtue or vice.

To one established in non-stealing, all wealth comes.

When improper thoughts disturb the mind, there should be constant pondering over the opposites.

The Siddhis (supernormal powers) are the result of birth, drugs, Mantras, austerities or Samadhi.

The three taken together constitute Samyama.

Then the Seer is established in his own essential and fundamental nature.

There, the consciousness is Truth-and-Right-bearing.

They have pleasure or pain as their fruit, according as their cause be virtue or vice.

To one who recognizes the distinctive relation between vitality and indweller comes omnipotence and omniscience.

When invited by invisible beings one should be neither flattered nor satisfied, for there is yet a possibility of ignorance rising up.

The significant aspect is the union of the mind with the moment of absorption, when the outgoing thought disappears and the absorptive experience appears.

The transformation from one species or kind into another is by the overflow of natural tendencies or potentialities.

Then the sequence of change in the three attributes comes to an end, for they have fulfilled their function.

Thereafter, one is undisturbed by the dualities.

They, whether manifest or unmanifest, are of the nature of Gunas.

Author Picture
First Name
Patañjali
Birth Date
240 B.C.
Death Date
180 B.C.
Bio

Indian Philosopher and Compiler of Yoga Sūtras and the Mahābhāṣya, Patañjali is a Sanskrit proper name. Several important Sanskrit works are ascribed to one or more authors of this name, and a great deal of scholarship has been devoted over the last century or so to the issue of disambiguation