Patañjali

Patañjali
240 B.C.
180 B.C.

Indian Philosopher and Compiler of Yoga Sūtras and the Mahābhāṣya, Patañjali is a Sanskrit proper name. Several important Sanskrit works are ascribed to one or more authors of this name, and a great deal of scholarship has been devoted over the last century or so to the issue of disambiguation

Author Quotes

There being difference of interest, one mind is the director of many minds.

These thought-streams are controlled by practice and non-attachment.

Through destruction of impurities, practice of austerities brings about perfection of the body and the organs.

Vows of self-restraint comprise abstention from violence, falsehood, theft, incontinence and acquisitiveness.

When the bonds of the mind caused by action have been loosened, one may enter the body of another by knowledge of how the nerve-currents function.

Nor is an object dependent on one mind. What would become of it when not cognized by that mind?

On the destruction of impurity by the sustained practice of the limbs of Union, the light of knowledge reveals the faculty of discrimination.

Purificatory action, study and making God the motive of action, IS the Yoga of action.

Success is speedy for the extremely energetic.

The cause of the association is ignorance.

The fourth Pranayama is that which follows when the spheres of the external and internal have been passed.

The mind becomes clarified by cultivating attitudes of friendliness, compassion, gladness and indifference respectively towards happiness, misery, virtue and vice.

The past and the future exist in the object itself as form and expression, there being difference in the conditions of the properties.

The Seen (objective side of manifestation) consists of the elements and sense-organs, is of the nature of cognition, activity and stability (Sattva, Rajas and Tamas) and has for its purpose (providing the Purusa with) experience and liberation.

Nor is it self-illuminative, for it is perceptible.

Once trained, the practitioner does not have an awareness of his surroundings. But, during mundane interactions, this awareness is regenerated for practical purposes.

Purity, contentment, austerity, self-study and self-surrender constitute Observances.

Supreme happiness is gained via contentment.

The cause of the avoidable is the superimposition of the external world onto the unseen world.

The grief which has not yet come may be avoided.

The mind becomes fit for concentration.

The past and the future exist in their own (real) form. The difference of Dharmas or properties is on account of the difference of paths.

The seen exists only for the sake of the Seer.

Nor is the mind self-luminous, as it can be known.

One-pointedness is steadfastness of the mind.

Author Picture
First Name
Patañjali
Birth Date
240 B.C.
Death Date
180 B.C.
Bio

Indian Philosopher and Compiler of Yoga Sūtras and the Mahābhāṣya, Patañjali is a Sanskrit proper name. Several important Sanskrit works are ascribed to one or more authors of this name, and a great deal of scholarship has been devoted over the last century or so to the issue of disambiguation