Patañjali

Patañjali
240 B.C.
180 B.C.

Indian Philosopher and Compiler of Yoga Sūtras and the Mahābhāṣya, Patañjali is a Sanskrit proper name. Several important Sanskrit works are ascribed to one or more authors of this name, and a great deal of scholarship has been devoted over the last century or so to the issue of disambiguation

Author Quotes

The eight limbs of Union are self-restraint in actions, fixed observance, posture, regulation of energy, mind-control in sense engagements, concentration, meditation, and realization.

The infinity of knowledge available to such a mind freed of all obscuration and property makes the universe of sensory perception seem small.

The modifications of the mind are always known to its lord on account of the changelessness of the Purusa.

The real object of Asana is control of the muscular system, conscious and unconscious, so that no messages from the body can reach the mind. Asana is concerned with the static aspect of the body. Pranayama is really the control of the dynamic aspect of the body.

On being firmly established in honesty all kinds of gems present themselves (before the Yogi).

Person who is full of Fantasies, will not be able to enjoy Reality.

Self-restraints, fixed observances, regulation of breath (Pranayama), abstraction, concentration, meditation and trance are the eight accessories of Yoga.

The argumentative condition is the confused mixing of the word, its right meaning, and knowledge.

The essence of the object consists in the uniqueness of transformation (of the Gunas).

The karmas bear fruits of pleasure and pain caused by merit and demerit.

The modifications of the mind are five-fold and are painful or not-painful.

The removal of the habitual thought patterns is similar to that of the afflictions already described.

Moreover, it is impossible for it to be of both ways (as perceiver and perceived) at the same time.

On being firmly established in sexual continence vigor (is) gained.

Posture (should be) steady and comfortable.

Seven kinds of ultimate insight come to him (the Yogin who has acquired discriminative enlightenment). One experiences the end of 1) desire to know anything more; 2) desire to stay away from anything; 3) desire to gain anything new; 4)desire to do anything; 5) sorrow; 6) fear; 7) delusion.

The association of the seer with Creation is for the distinct recognition of the objective world, as well as for the recognition of the distinct nature of the seer.

The experienced world consists of the elements and the senses in play. It is of the nature of cognition, activity and rest, and is for the purpose of experience and realization.

The knowable is of the nature of illumination, activity and inertia; it consists of the elements and the powers of sensation, action and thought; its objects are emancipation and experience.

The mutations of awareness are always known on account of the changelessness of its Lord, the indweller.

The repetition of Om should be made with an understanding of its meaning.

Most of us assume that human beings have free will. However... [we] are very much conditioned by our species, culture, family, and by the past in general... It is rare for a human being to have free will.

On being firmly established in truthfulness fruit (of action) rests on action (of the Yogi) only.

Practice is the effort to secure steadiness.

Sexual activity, and the thoughts and fantasies of sex, use up a great portion of our vital force. When that force is conserved through abstinence, it becomes sublimated as spiritual energy.

Author Picture
First Name
Patañjali
Birth Date
240 B.C.
Death Date
180 B.C.
Bio

Indian Philosopher and Compiler of Yoga Sūtras and the Mahābhāṣya, Patañjali is a Sanskrit proper name. Several important Sanskrit works are ascribed to one or more authors of this name, and a great deal of scholarship has been devoted over the last century or so to the issue of disambiguation