Patañjali

Patañjali
240 B.C.
180 B.C.

Indian Philosopher and Compiler of Yoga Sūtras and the Mahābhāṣya, Patañjali is a Sanskrit proper name. Several important Sanskrit works are ascribed to one or more authors of this name, and a great deal of scholarship has been devoted over the last century or so to the issue of disambiguation

Author Quotes

Pain, despair, nervousness, and disordered inspiration and expiration are co-existent with these obstacles.

Self-control on the heart brings knowledge of the mental entity.

That repulsion which accompanies pain is Dvesa.

The discriminating persons apprehend (by analysis and anticipation) all worldly objects as sorrowful because they cause suffering in consequence, in their afflictive experiences and in their latencies and also because of the contrary nature of the Gunas (which produces changes all the time).

The incidental cause does not move or stir up the natural tendencies into activity; it merely removes the obstacles, like a farmer (irrigating a field).

The misery which is not yet come can and is to be avoided.

The province of the subtle terminates with pure matter that has no pattern or distinguishing mark.

On attaining the purity of the ultra-meditative state there is the pure flow of spiritual consciousness.

Perfection of the body consists in beauty, grace, strength and adamantine hardness.

Self-restraint in actions includes abstention from violence, from falsehoods, from stealing, from sexual engagements, and from acceptance of gifts.

That same meditation when there is only consciousness of the object of meditation and not of the mind is realization.

The dissociation of Purusa and Prakrti brought about by the dispersion of Avidya is the real remedy and that is the Liberation of the Seer.

The indweller is pure consciousness only, which though pure, sees through the mind and is identified by ego as being only the mind.

The modifications of the life-breath are either external, internal or stationary. They are to be regulated by space, time and number and are either long or short.

The purpose of the coming together of the Purusa and Prakrti is gaining by the Purusa of the awareness of his true nature and the unfoldment of powers inherent in him and Prakrti.

On attaining the utmost purity of the Nirvicara stage (of Samadhi) there is the dawning of the spiritual light.

Perfection of the sense-organs and body after destruction of impurity by austerities.

Self-restraints, fixed observances, posture, regulation of breath, abstraction, concentration, contemplation, trance are the eight parts (of the self-discipline of Yoga).

The application of mastery is by stages.

The eight limbs of Union are self-restraint in actions, fixed observance, posture, regulation of energy, mind-control in sense engagements, concentration, meditation, and realization.

The infinity of knowledge available to such a mind freed of all obscuration and property makes the universe of sensory perception seem small.

The modifications of the mind are always known to its lord on account of the changelessness of the Purusa.

The real object of Asana is control of the muscular system, conscious and unconscious, so that no messages from the body can reach the mind. Asana is concerned with the static aspect of the body. Pranayama is really the control of the dynamic aspect of the body.

On being firmly established in honesty all kinds of gems present themselves (before the Yogi).

Person who is full of Fantasies, will not be able to enjoy Reality.

Author Picture
First Name
Patañjali
Birth Date
240 B.C.
Death Date
180 B.C.
Bio

Indian Philosopher and Compiler of Yoga Sūtras and the Mahābhāṣya, Patañjali is a Sanskrit proper name. Several important Sanskrit works are ascribed to one or more authors of this name, and a great deal of scholarship has been devoted over the last century or so to the issue of disambiguation