Pierre Cornielle

Pierre
Cornielle
1606
1684

French Playwright, Dramatist, Founder of French Tragedy

Author Quotes

Flee an enemy who knows your weakness.

Let us be friends, Cinna, it is I who invite you to be so.

Tyrant, step from the throne, and give place to thy master.

Generosity is toe accompaniment of high birth; pity and gratitude are its attendants.

Oh rage! Oh despair! Oh age, my enemy!

Violence is just, where kindness is vain.

Happiness seems made to be shared.

Patience and time conquer all things.

We never enjoy perfect happiness; our most fortunate successes are mingled with sadness; some anxieties always perplex the reality of our satisfaction.

He on whom heaven confers a sceptre knows not the weight till he bears it.

The man who pardons easily courts injury.

We triumph without glory when we conquer without danger.

He who allows himself to be insulted deserves to be so; and insolence, if unpunished, increases!

The secret of giving affectionately is great and rare; it requires address to do it well; otherwise we lose instead of deriving benefit from it. This man gives lavishly in a way that obliges no one; the manner of giving is worth more than the gift. Another loses intentionally at a game, thus disguising his present; another forgets a jewel, which would have been refused as a gift. A generous booby seems to be giving alms to his mistress when he is making a present.

When a woman has the gift of silence she possesses a quality above the vulgar. It is a gift of Heaven seldom bestowed; without a little miracle it cannot be accomplished; and Nature suffers violence when Heaven puts a woman in the humor of observing silence.

He who has resolved to conquer or die is seldom conquered; such noble despair perishes with difficulty.

The subject of a good tragedy must not be realistic.

When heaven half opens its arms, he who is faint-hearted, deserves not anything. - It is this want of faith that often keeps heaven from bestowing its blessings; and even when they come clown, it is apt to send them away.

Heaven often regulates effects by their causes, and pays the wicked what they have deserved.

The wrinkles on his forehead are the marks which his mighty deeds have engraved there, and still indicate what he was in former days.

When there is no peril in the fight there is no glory in the triumph.

Here honor binds me, and I wish to satisfy it.

There are secret ties, there are sympathies, by the sweet relationship of which souls that are well matched attach themselves to each other, and are affected by I know not what, which cannot be explained.

When we conquer without danger our triumph is without glory.

I agree to, or rather aspire to, my doom.

Author Picture
First Name
Pierre
Last Name
Cornielle
Birth Date
1606
Death Date
1684
Bio

French Playwright, Dramatist, Founder of French Tragedy