Søren Kierkegaard, fully Søren Aabye Kierkegaard

Søren
Kierkegaard, fully Søren Aabye Kierkegaard
1813
1855

Danish Philosopher, Theologian, Poet, Social Critic and Religious Author interested in Human Psychology

Author Quotes

It requires courage not to surrender oneself to the ingenious or compassionate counsels of despair that would induce a man to eliminate himself from the ranks of the living; but it does not follow from this that every huckster who is fattened and nourished in self-confidence has more courage than the man who yielded to despair.

Most men pursue pleasure with such breathless haste that they hurry past it.

Only when it is a duty to love, only then is love eternally and happily secured against despair.

Socrates proved the immortality of the soul from the fact that sickness of the soul (sin) does not consume it as bodily sickness consumes the body.

The more one thinks about it objectively, there is less.

There are always reasons for murdering a man. But there is no justification for his existence.

To dare is to lose one's footing momentarily. Not to dare is to lose oneself.

When a girl has given everything she has lost everything

It was completely fruitless to quarrel with the world, whereas the quarrel with oneself was occasionally fruitful and always, she had to admit, interesting.

Most people are subjective toward themselves and objective toward all others, frightfully objective sometimes — but the task is precisely to be objective toward oneself and subjective toward all others.

Our life always expresses the result of our dominant thoughts.

Spiritual superiority only sees the individual. But alas, ordinarily we human beings are sensual and, therefore, as soon as it is a gathering, the impression changes -- we see something abstract, the crowd, and we become different. But in the eyes of God, the infinite spirit, all the millions that have lived and now live do not make a crowd, He only sees each individual.

The most common form of despair is not being who you are.

There are many people who reach their conclusions about life like schoolboys: they cheat their master by copying the answer out of a book without having worked the sum out for themselves.

To defend something is always to discredit it. Let a man have a warehouse full of gold, let him be willing to give away a ducat to every one of the poor - but let him also be stupid enough to begin this charitable undertaking of his with a defence in which he offers three good reasons in justification; and it will almost come to the point of people finding it doubtful whether indeed he is doing something good. But now for Christianity. Yes, the person who defends that has never believed in it. If he does believe, then the enthusiasm of faith is not a defence, no, it is the assault and the victory; a believer is a victor.

When all combine in every way to make everything easier, people will want difficulty. I conceived it as my task to make difficulties everywhere.

In every man there is something which to a certain degree prevents him from becoming perfectly transparent to himself; and this may be the case in so high a degree, he may be so inexplicably woven into relationships of life which extend far beyond himself, that he almost cannot reveal himself. But he who cannot reveal himself cannot love, and he who cannot love is the most unhappy man of all.

Just as in earthly life lovers long for the moment when they are able to breathe forth their love for each other, to let their souls blend in a soft whisper, so the mystic longs for the moment when in prayer he can, as it were, creep into God.

Nature, the totality of created things, is the work of God. And yet God is not there; but within the individual man there is a potentiality (man is potentially spirit) which is awakened in inwardness to become a God-relationship, and then it becomes possible to see God everywhere.

Out of love, God becomes man. He says: See, here is what it is to be a human being.

Take away paradox from the thinker and you have a professor.

The most painful state of living is remembering the future.

There are, as is known, insects that die in the moment of fertilization. So it is with all joy: life's highest, most splendid moment of enjoyment is accompanied by death.

To have faith is precisely to lose one's mind so as to win God.

When one has once fully entered the realm of love, the world — no matter how imperfect — becomes rich and beautiful, it consists solely of opportunities for love.

Author Picture
First Name
Søren
Last Name
Kierkegaard, fully Søren Aabye Kierkegaard
Birth Date
1813
Death Date
1855
Bio

Danish Philosopher, Theologian, Poet, Social Critic and Religious Author interested in Human Psychology