Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Samuel Taylor
Coleridge
1772
1834

English Poet, Romantic, Literary Critic and Philosopher, a Founder of the Romantic Movement in England

Author Quotes

Wreathe iron pokers into true-love knots.

Ye lightnings, the dread arrows of the clouds! Ye signs and wonders of the element! Utter forth ' God,' and fill the hills with praise!

Ye living flowers that skirt the eternal frost.

To read Dryden, Pope, etc., you need only count syllables; but to read Donne you must measure time, and discover the time of each word by the sense of passion.

Up to twenty-one, I hold a father to have power over his children as to marriage; after that age, authority and influence only. Show me one couple unhappy merely on account of their limited circumstances, and I will show you ten who are wretched from other causes.

What a scream of agony by torture lengthened out that lute sent forth!

When Youth and I lived in't together.

To see him [Edmund Kean] act, is like reading Shakespeare by flashes of lightning.

Utter forth ' God,' and fill the hills with praise!

What can ail the mastiff bitch?

Where Alph, the sacred river, ran through caverns measureless to man down to a sunless sea.

To see him act is like reading Shakespeare by flashes of lightning.

Veracity does not consist in saying, but in the intention of communicating truth.

What comes from the heart goes to the heart.

Where blossomed many an incense-bearing tree.

To sentence a man of true genius to the drudgery of a school is to put a racehorse on a treadmill.

Visit her, gentle Sleep! with wings of healing, And may this storm be but a mountain-birth, May all the stars hang bright above her dwelling, Silent as though they watched the sleeping Earth!

What if you slept? And what if in your sleep you dreamed and what if in your dream you went to heaven and there plucked a strange and beautiful flower and what if when you awoke you had that flower in your hand ah, what then?

Where true Love burns Desire is Love's pure flame; it is the reflex of our earthly frame, that takes its meaning from the nobler part, and but translates the language of the heart.

Too foolish for a tear, too wicked for a smile!

Voice of sweet song! awake, my heart, awake!

What if you slept? And what if, in your sleep, you dreamed? And what if, in your dream, you went to heaven and there plucked an strange and beautiful flower? And what if, when you awoke, you had the flower in your hand? Ah, what then?

Where virtue is, sensibility is the ornament and becoming attire of virtue. On certain occasions it may almost be said to become virtue. But sensibility and all the amiable qualities may likewise become, and too often have become, the panders of vice and the instruments of seduction.

Too soon did the doctors of the church forget that the heart ? the moral nature ? was the beginning and the end, and that truth, knowledge, and insight were comprehended in its expansion.

Water, water everywhere and not a drop to drink.

Author Picture
First Name
Samuel Taylor
Last Name
Coleridge
Birth Date
1772
Death Date
1834
Bio

English Poet, Romantic, Literary Critic and Philosopher, a Founder of the Romantic Movement in England