Simon Sinek

Simon
Sinek
1973

English Author, Leadership Expert

Author Quotes

To spend more money, you have to have more money, but time is fixed and we all have the same amount to spare. How we choose to spend it can make a significant difference on the impact we have in our careers or in the world.

There is not a single one of us with a job that is not completely reliant in some way shape or form on others.

Truly human leadership protects an organization from the internal rivalries that can shatter a culture. When we have to protect ourselves from each other, the whole organization suffers. But when trust and cooperation thrive internally, we pull together and the organization grows stronger as a result.

There?s barely a product or service on the market today that customers can?t buy from someone else for about the same price, about the same quality, about the same level of service and about the same features. If you truly have a first-mover?s advantage, it?s probably lost in a matter of months. If you offer something truly novel, someone else will soon come up with something similar and maybe even better. But if you ask most businesses why their customers are their customers, most will tell you it?s because of superior quality, features, price or service. In other words, most companies have no clue why their customers are their customers. This is a fascinating realization.

Trust does not emerge simply because a seller makes a rational case why the customer should buy a product or service, or because an executive promises change. Trust is not a checklist. Fulfilling all your responsibilities does not create trust. Trust is a feeling, not a rational experience. We trust some people and companies even when things go wrong, and we don?t trust others even though everything might have gone exactly as it should have. A completed checklist does not guarantee trust. Trust begins to emerge when we have a sense that another person or organization is driven by things other than their own self-gain. With trust comes a sense of value?real value, not just value equated with money. Value, by definition, is the transference of trust. You can?t convince someone you have value, just as you can?t convince someone to trust you. You have to earn trust by communicating and demonstrating that you share the same values and beliefs. You have to talk about your WHY and prove it with WHAT you do.

There's nothing efficient about innovation.

Trust doesn't develop from always doing the right thing. It comes from taking responsibility when you do the wrong thing.

This is important because our behavior is affected by our assumptions or our perceived truths. We make decisions based on what we think we know.

Trust is maintained when values and beliefs are actively managed. If companies do not actively work to keep clarity, discipline and consistency in balance, then trust starts to break down.

The true price of leadership is the willingness to place the needs of others above your own. Great leaders truly care about those they are privileged to lead and understand that the true cost of the leadership privilege comes at the expense of self-interest.

This is what happens when the leaders of an organization listen to the people who work there. Without coercion, pressure or force, the people naturally work together to help each other and advance the company. Working with a sense of obligation is replaced by working with a sense of pride. And coming to work for the company is replaced by coming to work for each other. Work is no longer a place to dread. It is a place to feel valued.

two ways to influence human behavior: you can manipulate it or you can inspire it.

The U.S. Constitution protects our privacy from the prying eyes of government. It does not, however, protect us from the prying eyes of companies and corporations.

This relationship starts to clarify the difference between a vision statement and a mission statement in an organization. The vision is the public statement of the founder?s intent, WHY the company exists. It is literally the vision of a future that does not yet exist. The mission statement is a description of the route, the guiding principles?HOW the company intends to create that future.

Value is not determined by those who set the price. Value is determined by those who choose to pay it.

The world is a bell curve. Classroom test scores, employee performance in a company or how many people really, really like you. No matter the population you're studying, they always fit neatly across the standard deviations of the famous bell curve.

Those who are inspired are willing to pay a premium or endure inconvenience, even personal suffering. Those who are able to inspire will create a following of people?supporters, voters, customers, workers?who act for the good of the whole not because they have to, but because they want to.

Vision is the ability to talk about the future with such clarity it is as if we are talking about the past.

There are leaders and there are those who lead. Leaders hold a position of power or influence. Those who lead inspire us.

Those who have an opportunity to work in organizations that treat them like human beings to be protected rather than a resource to be exploited come home at the end of the day with an intense feeling of fulfillment and gratitude. This should be the rule for all of us, not the exception. Returning from work feeling inspired, safe, fulfilled and grateful is a natural human right to which we are all entitled and not a modern luxury that only a few lucky ones are able to find.

Wal-Mart's size and scale is so vast they literally have the ability to change the face of the entire country. If Wal-Mart were to make a decision tomorrow to refuse to sell a single product made with partially hydrogenated oils, for example, we'd probably see rates from heart disease decline a few years later. That's how powerful Wal-Mart is.

There are many ways to motivate people to do things, but loyalty comes from the ability to inspire people.

Those who lead inspire us? Whether they are individuals or organizations, we follow those who lead not because we have to but because we want to.

There are only two ways to influence human behavior: you can manipulate it or you can inspire it. Very few people or companies can clearly articulate WHY they do WHAT they do. By WHY I mean your purpose, cause or belief - WHY does your company exist? WHY do you get out of bed every morning? And WHY should anyone care? People don?t buy WHAT you do, they buy WHY you do it.

Though there are lessons that can be learned about becoming a great leader, most exist inherently in the bellies of those who lead.

Author Picture
First Name
Simon
Last Name
Sinek
Birth Date
1973
Bio

English Author, Leadership Expert