Simon Sinek

Simon
Sinek
1973

English Author, Leadership Expert

Author Quotes

The best ideas are the honest ones. Ones born out of personal experience. Ones that originated to help a few but ended up helping many.

The big picture doesn't just come from distance; it also comes from time.

The challenge of the unknown future is so much more exciting than the stories of the accomplished past.

The cost of leadership is self-interest.

The courage of leadership is giving others the chance to succeed even though you bear the responsibility for getting things done.

The course of time, all of Apple?s competitors lost their WHY. Now all those companies define themselves by WHAT they do: we make computers. They turned from companies with a cause into companies that sold products. And when that happens, price, quality, service and features become the primary currency to motivate a purchase decision. At that point a company and its products have ostensibly become commodities. As any company forced to compete on price, quality, service or features alone can attest, it is very hard to differentiate for any period of time or build loyalty on those factors alone.

The Democrats' response throughout the healthcare debate? Give the people more statistics.

Spending too much time focused on others' strengths leaves us feeling weak. Focusing on our own strengths is what, in fact, makes us strong.

The farther right you go on the curve, the more you will encounter the clients and customers who may need what you have, but don't necessarily believe what you believe. As clients, they are the ones for whom, no matter how hard you work, it's never enough. Everything usually boils down to price with them. They are rarely loyal. They rarely give referrals and sometimes you may even wonder out loud why you still do business with them. They just don't get it, our gut tells us. The importance of identifying this group is so that you can avoid doing business with them.

Starbucks was founded around the experience and the environment of their stores. Starbucks was about a space with comfortable chairs, lots of power outlets, tables and desks at which we could work and the option to spend as much time in their stores as we wanted without any pressure to buy. The coffee was incidental.

The goal is not simply to 'work hard, play hard.' The goal is to make our work and our play indistinguishable.

Start with WHY.

The goal is not to do business with everybody who needs what you have. The goal is to do business with people who believe what you believe.

Stress and anxiety at work have less to do with the work we do and more to do with weak management and leadership.

The human animal fundamentally hasn?t changed at all.

Studies show that over 80 percent of Americans do not have their dream job. If more knew how to build organizations that inspire, we could live in a world in which that statistic was the reverse - a world in which over 80 percent of people loved their jobs. People who love going to work are more productive and more creative. They go home happier and have happier families. They treat their colleagues and clients and customers better. Inspired employees make for stronger companies and stronger economies.

The irony is, the advertising industry knows everyone hates what they produce. This is why they keep looking for new ways to force people to stay tuned.

Successful succession is more than selecting someone with an appropriate skill set?it?s about finding someone who is in lockstep with the original cause around which the company was founded. Great second or third CEOs don?t take the helm to implement their own vision of the future; they pick up the original banner and lead the company into the next generation. That?s why we call it succession, not replacement. There is a continuity of vision.

The lack of a clear set of values and beliefs, along with the weak culture that resulted, created the conditions for an every-man-for-himself environment, the long-term impact of which could yield little else than disaster. This is caveman stuff.

That?s the problem with love; we only know when we?ve found it because it just feels right.

The leaders who get the most out of their people are the leaders who care most about their people.

The ability of a group of people to do remarkable things hinges on how well those people pull together as a team.

One of the best paradoxes of leadership is a leader's need to be both stubborn and open-minded. A leader must insist on sticking to the vision and stay on course to the destination. But he must be open-minded during the process.

Returning from work feeling inspired, safe, fulfilled and grateful is a natural human right to which we are all entitled and not a modern luxury that only a few lucky ones are able to find.

Only when the WHY is clear and when people believe what you believe can a true loyal relationship develop.

Author Picture
First Name
Simon
Last Name
Sinek
Birth Date
1973
Bio

English Author, Leadership Expert