Simon Sinek

Simon
Sinek
1973

English Author, Leadership Expert

Author Quotes

Some would argue that you're as successful as the company you keep. Certainly there is a connection between our friends and who we are.

Panic causes tunnel vision. Calm acceptance of danger allows us to more easily assess the situation and see the options.

Sometimes spending time with someone who is perceived as 'successful' can make us feel less successful.

People don?t buy WHAT you do, they buy WHY you do it... And what you do simply proves what you believe.

Spending time with the military certainly lends itself to some remarkable experiences, and I've been privileged to have had my share.

Pilots have their names painted just beneath the canopy of their aircraft. This gives the pilot a sense of ownership for his or her jet. What's more, like cars, each aircraft has its own personality, so it's important for a pilot to get to know and love his aircraft.

Pilots, to a large degree, are like salesmen. They have to be confident to be good at their jobs. They have to practice relentlessly and plan out all the scenarios of the things that could happen when they're out there. Nothing is more important than preparation. They are also mighty competitive, both as individuals and as squadrons.

Poor leaders push us towards the goal. Great leaders guide us through the journey.

Products with a clear sense of WHY give people a way to tell the outside world who they are and what they believe. Remember, people don?t buy WHAT you do, they buy WHY you do it. If a company does not have a clear sense of WHY then it is impossible for the outside world to perceive anything more than WHAT the company does. And when that happens, manipulations that rely on pushing price, features, service or quality become the primary currency of differentiation.

Pushing yourself to be the best is unsustainable. Simply push yourself to be better than the day before.

Not until those without information relinquish their control can an organization run better, smoother and faster and reach its maximum potential.

Put bluntly, the struggle that so many companies have to differentiate or communicate their true value to the outside world is not a business problem, it's a biology problem. And just like a person struggling to put her emotions into words, we rely on metaphors, imagery and analogies in an attempt to communicate how we feel. Absent the proper language to share our deep emotions, our purpose, cause or belief, we tell stories. We use symbols. We create tangible things for those who believe what we believe to point to and say, ?That's why I'm inspired.? If done properly, that's what marketing, branding and products and services become; a way for organizations to communicate to the outside world. Communicate clearly and you shall be understood.

Notoriously outspoken, his sentences always punctuated with profanities, General George S. Patton was the epitome of what a leader should be like - or so he thought. Patton believed a leader should look and act tough, so he cultivated his image and his personality to match his philosophy.

Quality effective leaders have the confidence to trust others to try, succeed, and sometimes to fail. We very often confuse personality with leadership. In other words, leadership is not about being a nice person or not a nice person. Some good leaders are rough around the edges and some leaders are difficult. Some have difficult personalities and some are really nice to be around, but those are not the qualifications. The qualifications are their desire to see us achieve more, their desire to push us to be the best we can be. Not for their selfish gain, but because they believe that we have something to offer. The bad leaders are the ones that push hard so they can gain, who brow beat us so that they can receive the benefit of our hard work, not so we can enjoy the success.

Offer someone the opportunity to rebuild a company or reinvent an industry as the primary incentive, and it will attract those drawn to the challenge first and the money second.

Republicans are completely befuddled by Obama's 'star power' and don't seem to have a clear or effective strategy to compete.

One of the best paradoxes of leadership is a leader's need to be both stubborn and open-minded. A leader must insist on sticking to the vision and stay on course to the destination. But he must be open-minded during the process.

Returning from work feeling inspired, safe, fulfilled and grateful is a natural human right to which we are all entitled and not a modern luxury that only a few lucky ones are able to find.

Only when the WHY is clear and when people believe what you believe can a true loyal relationship develop.

Serve those who serve others.

Organizations should say and do the things they ACTUALLY believe.

So much of starting a business or affecting change is the confidence and courage to simply try.

Our need to belong is not rational, but it is a constant that exists across all people in all cultures.

Some in management positions operate as if they are in a tree of monkeys. They make sure that everyone at the top of the tree looking down sees only smiles. But all too often, those at the bottom looking up see only asses.

Leadership, Alpha, comes at a cost. You see, we expect that when danger threatens us from the outside, that the person who is actually stronger, the person who is better fed, and the person who is teaming with serotonin and actually has higher confidence than the rest of us; we expect them to run towards the danger to protect us. This is what it means to be a leader. The cost of leadership is self-interest. If you're not willing to give up your perks when it matters, then you probably shouldn't get promoted. You might be an authority but you will not be a leader. Leadership comes at a cost. You don't get to do less work when you get more senior, you have to do more work. And the more work you have to do is put yourself at risk to look after others. That is the anthropological definition of what a leader IS.

Author Picture
First Name
Simon
Last Name
Sinek
Birth Date
1973
Bio

English Author, Leadership Expert