Thomas Kempis, aka Thomas à Kempis, Thomas von Kempen, Thomas Haemerkken or Hammerlein or Hemerken or Hämerken

Thomas
Kempis, aka Thomas à Kempis, Thomas von Kempen, Thomas Haemerkken or Hammerlein or Hemerken or Hämerken
1380
1471

German Scholar, Ecclesiastic, Copiest and Probable Author of "The Imitation of Christ"

Author Quotes

Intelligence must follow faith, never precede it, and never destroy it.

Love is swift, sincere, pious, pleasant, gentle, strong, patient, faithful, prudent, long-suffering, manly, and never seeking her own.

Thou wilt enjoy tranquillity if thy heart condemn thee not.

We should have much peace if we would not busy ourselves with the sayings and doings of others.

Those who love with purity consider not the gift of the lover, but the love of the giver.

Temptation discovers what we are.

That learning which thou gettest by thy own observation and experience, is far beyond that which thou gettest by precept; as the knowledge of a traveler exceeds that which is got by reading.

The highest and most profitable learning is the knowledge of ourselves. To have a low opinion of our own merits, and to think highly of others, is an evidence of wisdom. All men are frail, but thou shouldst reckon none so frail as thyself.

Our own opinion of ourselves should be lower than that formed by others, for we have a better chance at our imperfections.

Purity and simplicity are the two wings with which man soars above the earth and all temporary nature. Simplicity is in the intention, purity in the affection; simplicity turns to God; purity unites with and enjoys Him.

Occasions of adversity best discover how great virtue or strength each one hath. For occasions do not make a man frail, but they show what he is.

No conflict is so severe as his who labors to subdue himself.

If thou canst not make thyself such an one as thou wouldst, how canst thou expect to have another in all things to thy liking?

In judging of others a man laboreth in vain, often erreth, and easily sinneth; but in judging and examining himself, he always laboreth fruitfully.

He will easily be content and at peace, whose conscience is pure.

How seldom we weigh our neighbor in the same balance with ourselves!

Happy is the man who renounces everything which may bring a stain or burden upon his conscience.

He that avoideth not small faults, by little and little falleth into greater.

Great tranquillity of heart is his who cares for neither praise nor blame.

Habit is overcome by habit.

Endeavor to be always patient of the faults and imperfections of others; for thou has many faults and imperfections of thine own that require forbearance. If thou art not able to make thyself that which thou wishest, how canst thou expect to mold another in conformity to thy will?

First keep the peace within yourself, then you can also bring peace to others.

Constantly choose rather to want less, than to have more.

Do not concern yourself with anxiety for the shadow of a great name.

All men command patience, although few be willing to practice it.

Author Picture
First Name
Thomas
Last Name
Kempis, aka Thomas à Kempis, Thomas von Kempen, Thomas Haemerkken or Hammerlein or Hemerken or Hämerken
Birth Date
1380
Death Date
1471
Bio

German Scholar, Ecclesiastic, Copiest and Probable Author of "The Imitation of Christ"