William Gurnall

William
Gurnall
1617
1679

English Author and Clergyman

Author Quotes

God would not rub so hard if it were not to fetch out the dirt that is ingrained in our natures. God loves purity so well He had rather see a hole than a spot in His child's garments.

One Almighty is more than all mighties.

The storm may be tempestuous, but it is only temporary.

God, to prevent all escape, hath sown the seeds of death in our very constitution and nature, so that we can as soon run from ourselves, as run from death. We need no feller to come with a hand of violence and hew us down; there is in the tree a worm, which grows out of its own substance, that will destroy it; so in us, those infirmities of nature that will bring us down to the dust.

Paul was Nero's prisoner, but Nero was much more God's... But how does the great apostle spend his time in prison?... We read of no dispatches sent to court to procure his liberty; but many to the churches, to help them to stand fast in the liberty wherewith Christ had made them free... The devil had as good have let Paul alone, for he no sooner comes into prison but he falls a preaching, at which the gates of Satan's prison fly open, and poor sinners come forth.

There is no such way to be even with the devil and his instruments, for all their spite against us, as by doing what good we can wherever we become.

He that is impatient, and cannot wait on God for a mercy, will not easily submit to Him in a denial.

Peace of conscience is nothing but the echo of pardoning mercy.

Therefore tremble, O man, at any power thou hast, except thou usest it for God. Art thou strong in body; who hath thy strength? God, or thy lusts?

He that loves the Word and the purity of its precepts cannot turn traitor.

Pray often rather than very long at a time. It is hard to be very long in prayer, and not slacken in our affections.

To forsake sin, is to leave it without any thought reserved of returning to it again.

Hope fills the afflicted soul with such inward joy and consolation, that it can laugh while tears are in the eye, sigh and sing all in a breath; it is called "the rejoicing of hope" (Hebrews 3:6).

Prayer is nothing but the promise reversed, or God's Word formed into an argument, and retorted by faith upon God again.

Truly, hope is the saint's covering, wherein he wraps himself, when he lays his body down to sleep in the grave: "My flesh," saith David, "shall rest in hope."

And therefore you who think so basely of the Gospel and the professors of it, because at present their peace and comfort are not come, should know that it is on the way to them, and comesto stay everlastingly with them; whreas your peace is going is going from you every moment, and is sure to leave you without any hope of returning to you again. Look not how the Christian begins, but ends.

Indeed all the saints are taught the same lesson - to renounce their own strength, and rely on the power of God; their own policy, and cast themselves on the wisdom of God; their own righteousness, and expect all from the pure mercy of God in Christ, which act of faith is so pleasing to God, that such a soul shall never be ashamed.

Praying is the same to the new creature as crying is to the natural. The child is not learned by art or example to cry, but instructed by nature; it comes into the world crying. Praying is not a lesson got by forms and rules of art, but flowing from principles of new life itself.

We are bid to take, not to make our cross.

As the eye of the body once put out, can never be restored by the creature's art, so neither can the spiritual eye lost by Adam's sin be restored by the teaching of men or angels. It is one of the diseases which Christ came to cure.

It is no policy to let thy lusts have arms, which are sure to rise and declare against thee when thine enemy comes.

Pride of gifts robs us of God's blessing in the use of them.

We are justified, not by giving anything to God,--what we do,--but by receiving from God, what Christ hath done for us.

Bid faith look through the key-hole of the promise, and tell thee what it sees there laid up for him that overcomes; bid it listen and tell thee whether it cannot hear the shout of those crowned saints, as of those that are dividing the spoil, and receiving the reward of all their services and sufferings here on earth.

It is one thing to know a truth, and another thing to know it by unction.

Author Picture
First Name
William
Last Name
Gurnall
Birth Date
1617
Death Date
1679
Bio

English Author and Clergyman