Mistrust

The worst of poisons: to mistrust (despair) one's power.

Doubt and mistrust are the mere panic of timid imagination, which the steadfast heart will conquer, and the large mind transcend.

One cannot but mistrust a prospect of felicity: one must enjoy it before one can believe in it.

People have generally three epochs in their confidence in man. In the first they believe him to be everything that is good, and they are lavish with their friendship and confidence. In the next, they have had experience, which has smitten down their confidence, and they; then have to be careful not to mistrust every one, and to put the worst construction upon everything. Later in life, they learn that the greater number of men have much; more good in them than bad, and that even when there is cause to blame, there is more reason to pity than condemn; and then a spirit of confidence again awakens within them.

Always mistrust a subordinate who never finds fault with the superior.

Mistrust all in whom the urge to punish is strong!

As the sun makes the ice melt, kindness causes misunderstanding, mistrust, and hostility to evaporate.

I am firmly convinced that the passionate will for justice and truth has done more to improve [the human condition] than calculating political shrewdness which in the long run only breeds general mistrust.

Constant kindness can accomplish much. As the sun makes ice melt, kindness causes misunderstanding, mistrust, and hostility to evaporate.

Mistrust your zeal for doing good to others.

Mistrust your zeal for doing good to others.

One might equate growing up with a mistrust of words. A mature person trusts his eyes more than his ears. Irrationality often manifests itself in upholding the word against the evidence of the eyes. Children, savages and true believers remember far less what they have seen than what they have heard.

Mistrust the man who finds everything good, the man who finds everything evil and still more the man who is indifferent to everything.

Always mistrust a subordinate who never finds fault with his superior.

Mistrust no man without cause, neither be ye credulous without proofe.

Hope and fear bring trust and mistrust by turns.

When one professes [courage] too openly, by words or beating, there is a reason to mistrust it.

We must respect the past, and mistrust the present, if we wish to provide for the safety of the future.

There is a good deal to be said for frivolity. Frivolous people, when all is said and done, do less harm in the world than some of our philanthropisers and reformers. Mistrust a man who never has an occasional flash of silliness.