wise

Politics is a place of humble hopes and strangely modest requirements, where all good who are not criminal and all are wise who are not ridiculously otherwise.

A prudent person profits from personal experience, a wise one from the experience of others.

Any fool can carry on, but only the wise can shorten sail.

A wise man reflects before he speaks; a fool speaks and then reflects on what he has uttered.

The fool who knows his foolishness is wise at least so far, but a fool who thinks himself wise, he is called a fool indeed.

The art of meditation may be exercised at all hours, and in all places; and men of genius, in their walks at table, and amidst assemblies, turning the eye of the mind inwards, can form an artificial solitude; retired amidst a crowd, calm amidst distraction, and wise amidst folly.

The wisdom of the wise and the experience of ages may be preserved by quotation.

Men who are wise are wise in time.

How wise must one be to be always kind.

The wise man is seldom prudent.

He that resolves upon any great and good end, has, by the very resolution, scaled the chief barrier to it. He will find such resolution removing difficulties, searching out or making means, giving courage for despondency, and strength for weakness and like the star to the wise men of old, ever guiding him nearer and nearer to perfection.

Before God we are all equally wise - equally foolish.

No man can be wise on an empty stomach.

He who is not wise for himself is not wise in anything.

A wise man is he who does not grieve for the thing which he has not, but rejoices for those which he has.

The two powers which in my opinion constitute a wise man are those of bearing and forebearing.

These are the signs of a wise man: to reprove nobody, to praise nobody, to blame nobody, nor event speak of himself or his own efforts.

The more ideas a man has the fewer words he takes to express them. Wise men never talk to make time; they talk to save it.

The wise man seeks little joys, knowing that life is long and that his quota of great joys is distinctly limited.

God, who is liberal in all his other gifts, shows us, by the wise economy of his providence, how circumspect we ought to be in the management of our time, for he never gives us two moments together.