wise

There was a wise man in the east whose constant prayer was that he might see today with the eyes of tomorrow.

The wise is not hasty to answer.

A wise man sees as much as he ought, not as much as he can.

We want to live our lives as wise warriors and die as men. We may not even know what it is until the moments of our deaths. Then, the questions come. Have we worked to release another soul from pain? Have we opened a way that was once closed? Have we learned from the steeps and dips? Then we can rest assured that we have lived as men and died as warriors.

A man should never be assumed foolish till he has proved himself foolish - this we owe him. A man should never be assumed wise till he has proved himself wise - this we owe to ourselves.

The owl is, therefore, the bird of wisdom because even a fool can see when it is light; it is the wise man who can see when it is dark.

Show is not substance; realities govern wise men.

From the errors of others a wise man corrects his own.

He bids fair to grow wise who has discovered that he is not so.

Loss pains the miser, not the wise man.

Silence is the highest wisdom of a fool as speech is the greatest trial of a wise man. If thou wouldst be known as wise, let thy words show thee so; if thou doubt thy words, let thy silence feign thee so. It is not a greater point of wisdom to discover knowledge than to hide ignorance.

Art is always the index of social vitality, the moving finger that records the destiny of a civilization. A wise statesman should keep an anxious eye on this graph, for it is more significant than a decline in exports or a fall in the value of a nation's currency.

The question is, whether, like the Divine Child I the temple, we are turning knowledge into wisdom, and whether, understanding more of the mysteries of life, we are feeling more of its sacred law; and whether, having left behind the priests and the scribes and the doctors and the fathers, we are about our Father’s business, and becoming wise to God.

It is easier to be wise for others than for ourselves.

The wise who consorts with fools will become a fool, and the fool who consorts with fools will become a greater fool.

A childlike mind, in its simplicity, practices that science of good to which the wise may be blind.

Thought wit be very useful, yet unless a wise man has the keeping of it, that knows when, where, and how to apply it, it is like wild-fire, that flies at rovers, runs hissing about, and blows up everything that comes in its way. Without any respect or discrimination.

Perhaps, if only the tale told by the wise men is true and there is a bourne to welcome us, then he whom we think we have lost has only been sent on ahead.