Jealousy

The spirit of the world has four kinds of spirits diametrically opposed to charity - resentment, aversion, jealousy, and indifference.

Jealousy is no more than feeling alone against smiling enemies.

Discourtesy does not spring merely from one bad quality, but from several - from foolish vanity, from ignorance of what is due to others, from indolence, from stupidity, from the distraction of thought, from contempt of others, from jealousy.

Jealousy sees things always with magnifying glasses which make little things large, of dwarfs giants, of suspicions truths.

It is not love that is blind, but jealousy.

Jealousy and lust, and ambition drive a man out of the world.

Jealousy is never satisfied with anything short of an omniscience that would detect the subtlest fold of the heart.

Jealousy: that dragon which slays love under the pretense of keeping it alive.

Jealousy is a painful passion; yet without some share of it, the agreeable affection of love has difficulty to subsist in its full force and violence.

There is never jealousy where there is not strong regard.

We enter our studies, and enjoy a society which we alone can bring together. We raise no jealousy by conversing with one in preference to another; we give no offense to the most illustrious by questioning him as long as we will, and leaving him as abruptly. Diversity of opinion raises no tumult in our presence: each interlocutor stands before us, speaks or is silence, and we adjourn or decide the business at our leisure.

To doubt is an injury; to suspect a friend is breach of friendship; jealousy is a seed sown but in vicious minds; prone to distrust, because apt to deceive.

Jealousy is an awkward homage which inferiority renders to merit.

Self-pity deprives us of the beauty of the past; fear deprives us of the beauty of the future; and jealousy deprives us of the beauty of the moment.

Jealousy is the fear or apprehension of superiority; envy our uneasiness under it.

Whatever convenience may be thought to be in falsehood and dissimulation, it is soon over; but the inconvenience of it is perpetual, because it brings a man under everlasting jealousy and suspicion, so that he is not believed when he speaks the truth, nor trusted when perhaps he means honestly.

Moral indignation is jealousy with a halo.

Disgrace kills hatred and jealousy. Once someone is no longer a favorite and no longer envied... he might even be a hero and not annoy us.

Jealousy is the art of injuring ourselves more than others.