Learning

Kindness has converted more sinners than zeal, eloquence or learning.

What is important is to keep learning, to enjoy challenge, and to tolerate ambiguity. In the end there are no certain answers.

We believe in optimism rather than pessimism, hope rather than despair, learning in the place of dogma, truth instead of ignorance, joy rather than guild or sin, tolerance in the place of fear, love instead of hatred, compassion over selfishness, beauty instead of ugliness and reason rather than blind faith or irrationality.

In English, we have no single word that captures "love of learning." In Chinese, there is a single phrase "hao-xue-xin" which translates into English as "the heart and mind for wanting to learn" and nicely captures this strength of character.

A little learning is a dangerous thing.

Once you have learned how to ask questions - relevant and appropriate and substantial questions - you have learned how to learn and no one can keep you from learning whatever you want or need to know.

There are no secrets to success. It is the result of preparation, hard work learning from failure.

Don't limit your child to your own learning, for he was born in another time.

The Ten Commandments, and religious principles in general, simply tell you what to do. Learning to think morally (i.e., philosophically) helps you to discover both what to do, and why.

Neither comprehension nor learning can take place in an atmosphere of anxiety.

We underrate our brains and our intelligence. Education has become such a complicated and overregulated activity that learning is regarded as something difficult that the brain would rather not do... But reluctance to learning cannot be attributed to the brain. Learning is one of the brain's primary functions, its constant concern, and we become restless and frustrated if there is no learning to be done. We are all capable of high and unsuspected learning accomplishments without effort.

Complacency is the enemy. We cannot really learn anything until we rid ourselves of complacency. Our attitude towards ourselves should be "insatiable in learning" and towards others to be "tireless in teaching."

Learning is not attained by chance, it must be sought for with ardor and attended to with diligence.

Learning is not attained by chance, it must be sought for with ardor and attended to with diligence.

Learning is not attained by chance. It must be sought for with ardor and attended with diligence.

If our freedom means ease alone, if it means shirking the hard disciplines of learning, if it means evading the rigors and rewards of creative activity, if it means more expenditure on advertising than education, if it means in the schools the steady cult of the trivial and the mediocre, if it means - worst of all - indifference, or even contempt for all but athletic excellence, we may keep for a time the forms of free society, but its spirit will be dead.

If our freedom means ease alone, if it means shirking the hard disciplines of learning, if it means evading the rigors and rewards of creative activity, if it means more expenditure on advertising than education, if it means in the schools the steady cult of the trivial and the mediocre, if it means - worst of all - indifference, or even contempt for all but athletic excellence, we may keep for a time the forms of free society, but its spirit will be dead.

If our freedom means ease alone, if it means shirking the hard disciplines of learning, if it means evading the rigors and rewards of creative activity, if it means more expenditure on advertising than education, if it means in the schools the steady cult of the trivial and the mediocre, if it means - worst of all - indifference, or even contempt for all but athletic excellence, we may keep for a time the forms of free society, but its spirit will be dead.

It is through suffering that learning comes.

It is through suffering that learning comes.