Prudence

There is no unmixed good in human affairs; the best principles, if pushed to excess, degenerate into fatal vices. Generosity is nearly allied to extravagance; charity itself may lead to ruin; the sternness of justice is but one step removed from the severity of oppression. It is the same in the political world; the tranquillity of despotism resembles the stagnation of the Dead Sea; the fever of innovation the tempests of the ocean It would seem as if, at particular periods, from causes inscrutable to human wisdom, a universal frenzy seizes mankind; reason, experience, prudence, are alike blinded; and the very classes who are to perish in the storm are the first to raise its fury.

Embellish the soul with simplicity, with prudence, and everything which is neither virtuous nor vicious. Love all men. Walk according to God; for, as a poet hath said, his laws govern all.

[Wisdom] teacheth temperance and prudence, justice and fortitude.

Moral virtue can be without some of the intellectual virtues, namely, wisdom, science and art, but not without understanding and prudence. Moral virtue cannot be without prudence, because moral virtue is habit of choosing, that is, making us choose well.

Prudence considers the means of acquiring happiness, but wisdom considers the very object of happiness.

Prudence is the necessary ingredient in all the virtues, without which they degenerate into folly and excess.

Courage is a virtue only so far as it is directed by prudence.

The prudence of the best heads is often defeated by the tenderness of the best of hearts.

To God we owe fear and love; to our neighbours justice and character; to our selves prudence and sobriety.

In matters of conscience first thoughts are best; in matters of prudence last thoughts are best.

Prudence, temperance, strengthe, and right, The foure ben vertues principal.

Frugality may be termed the daughter of prudence, the sister of temperance, and the parent of liberty.

Prudence keeps life safe, but does not often make it happy.

Those who, in the confidence of superior capacities or attainments, neglect the common maxims of life, should be reminded that nothing will supply the want of prudence; but that negligence and irregularity, long continued will make knowledge useless, with ridiculous, and genius contemptible.

Genius always gives its best at first; prudence, at last.

I consider it a mark of great prudence in a man to abstain from threats or any contemptuous expressions, for neither of these weaken the enemy, but threats make him more cautious, and the other excites his hatred, and a desire to revenge himself.

Humility, liberality, chastity, meekness, temperance, brotherly love, and diligence, are the virtues contrary to the Seven Capital Sins... Prudence, justice, fortitude, temperance, are the Four Cardinal Virtues.

Slow deliberation is but prudence.

You will conquer more surely by prudence than by passion.

Temper your enjoyments with prudence, lest there be written on your heart that fearful word "satiety."