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Religion

Esteeming others merely for their agreement with us in religion, opinion, and manner of living is only a less offensive kind of self-adoration. - Thomas Adam
It is indifference which is the cause of most of our unhappiness. Indifference to religion, to the happiness of others, and to the precious gift of freedom, and the wide liberty that is the inheritance of all in a free land. Are we our "Brother's Keeper"? We certainly are! If we had no regard for others' feelings or fortune, we would grow cold and indifferent to life itself. Bound up with selfishness, we could not hope for the success that could easily be ours. - George Matthew Adams
Though religion... always envelops conduct, the sentiment of religion and the sense of moral value are distinct. - Samuel Alexander
Religion tends to speak the language of the heart, which is the language of friends, lovers, children, and parents. -
Nothing has wrought more prejudice to religion, or brought more disparagement upon truth, than boisterous and unseasonable zeal. - Isaac Barrow
To revenge a wrong is easy, usual, and natural, and, as the world thinks, savors of nobleness of mind; but religion teaches the contrary, and tells us it is better to neglect than to require it. - J. Beaumont
All the principles which religion teaches, and all the habits which it forms, are favorable to strength of mind. It will be found that whatever purifies fortifies also the heart. - Hugh Blair
The spirit of true religion breathes gentleness and affability; it gives a native, unaffected ease to the behavior; it is social, kind, cheerful; far removed from the cloudy and illiberal disposition which clouds the brow, sharpens the temper, and dejects the spirit. - Hugh Blair
Religion converts despair, which destroys, into resignation, which submits. - Marguerite Gardiner, Countess of Blessington, Lady Blessington, born Margaret Power
We walk, and our religion is shown (even in the dullest and most insensitive person) in how we walk. Or to put it more accurately, living in this world means choosing, choosing to walk, and the way we choose to walk is infallibly and perfectly expressed in the walk itself. Nothing can disguise it. The walk of an ordinary man and of an enlightened man are as different as that of a snake and a giraffe. - R. H. Blyth, fully Reginald Horace Blyth
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