satire

Praise undeserved is satire in disguise.

A jealous man is very quick in his application: he knows how to find a double edge in an invective, and to draw a satire on himself out of a panegyrick on another.

Art should be a satire and a warning against our paralyzed emotions, our devitalized thinking and our denaturalized living. It teaches us unsophistication in a sophisticated world. It should restore to us health and sanity caused by too much mental activity. It should sharpen our senses, re-establish the connection between our reason and our human nature, and assemble the ruined parts of a dislocated life again into a whole, by restoring our original nature.

Of all debts men are least willing to pay the taxes. What a satire is this on government! Everywhere they think they get their money’s worth, except for these.

I advocate the arts of satire and of ridicule. And I see no other living art form for the future. Ridicule is the only honourable weapon we have left.

An emancipated society, on the other hand, would not be a unitary state, but the realization of universality in the reconciliation of differences.

I just want it to look like nothing else in the world. And it should be surrounded by a train.

The way to get started is to quit talking and begin doing

It was, as I have said, a fine autumnal day; the sky was clear and serene, and nature wore that rich and golden livery which we always associate with the idea of abundance. The forests had put on their sober brown and yellow, while some trees of the tenderer kind had been nipped by the frosts into brilliant dyes of orange, purple, and scarlet.

The consolations of space are nameless things. It was after the neurosis of winter. It was in the genius of summer that they blew up the statue of Jove among the boomy clouds. It took all day to quieten the sky and then to refill its emptiness again.

So be sweet and kind to mother now and then, have a chat! Buy her candy or some flowers or a brand-new hat. But maybe you best let it go at that! Or you may find yourself with a quite complex/

A Corinthian, a lad of mettle, a good boy. King Henry IV. Part I. Act ii. Sc. 4.