There are seven things that will destroy us: Wealth without work; Pleasure without conscience; Knowledge without character; Religion without sacrifice; Politics without principle; Science without humanity; Business without ethics.

Charity literally translated from the original means love, the love that understands, that does not merely share the wealth of the giver, but in true sympathy and wisdom helps men to help themselves.

Our contemporary concern about meaning is peculiar to the modern world. It arises from our relative wealth and freedom in the context of malaise, even despair, about man's ability to achieve lasting and genuine happiness.

Wealthy men are insolent and arrogant; their possession of wealth affects their understanding; they feel as if they had every good thing that exists; wealth becomes a sort of standard of value for everything else, and therefore they imagine there is nothing it cannot buy... In a word, the type of character produced by wealth is that of a prosperous fool.

It is well to be up before daybreak, for such habits contribute to health, wealth and wisdom.

It is difficult, if not impossible, to define the limits which reason should impose on the desire for wealth; for there is no absolute or definite amount of wealth which will satisfy a man.

The man who has been born into a position of wealth comes to look upon it as something without which he could no more live than he could live without air; he guards it as he does his very life; and so he is generally a lover of order, prudent and economical. But the man who has been born into a poor position looks upon it as the natural one, and if by any chance he comes in for a fortune, he regards it as a superfluity, something to be enjoyed or wasted, because, if it comes to an end, he can get on just as well as before, with one anxiety the less.

The real measure of our wealth is our worth if we lost our money.

When wealth is lost, nothing is lost; when health is lost, something is lost; when character is lost, all is lost!

Measure wealth not by the things you have, but by the things you have for which you would not take money.

The real measure of your wealth is how much you'd be worth if you lost all your money.

For myself, I am certain that the good of human life cannot lie in the possession of things which, for one person to possess, is for the rest to lose, but rather in things which all can possess alike, and where one person's wealth promotes their neighbor's.

By wisdom wealth is won; but riches purchased wisdom yet for none.

Great wealth is a great blessing to a man who knows what to do with it.

Teach us that wealth is not elegance, that profusion is not magnificence, that splendor is not beauty.

Gross and vulgar minds will always pay a higher respect to wealth than to talent; for wealth, although it be a far less efficient source of power than talent, happens to be far more intelligible.

Gross and vulgar minds will always pay a higher respect to wealth than to talent; for wealth, although it be a far less efficient sources of power than talent, happens to be far more intelligible.

He that will not permit his wealth to do any good to others while he is living, prevents it from doing any good to himself when he is dead; and by an egotism that is suicidal and has a double edge, cuts himself from the truest pleasure here and the highest happiness hereafter.

Men pursue riches under the idea that their possession will set them at ease and above the world. But the law of association often makes those who begin by loving gold as a servant, finish by becoming its slave; and independence without wealth is at least as common as wealth without independence.

Men pursue riches under the idea that their possession will set them at ease and above the world. But the law of association often makes those who begin by loving gold as a servant, finish by becoming its slaves; and independence without wealth is at least as common as wealth without independence.