Great Throughts Treasury

A database of quotes

Related Quotes

Francis Beaumont

If men would wound you with injuries, meet them with patience: hasty words rankle the wound, soft language, dresses it, forgiveness cures it, and oblivion takes away the scar. It is more noble by silence to avoid an injury than by argument to overcome it.

Argument | Character | Forgiveness | Language | Men | Oblivion | Patience | Silence | Words | Forgiveness |

Hugh Blair

Nothing leads more directly to the breach of charity, and to the injury and molestation of our fellow-creatures than the indulgence of an ill temper.

Character | Charity | Indulgence | Nothing | Temper |

Edicts of Ashoka NULL

He who does reverence to his own sect, while disparaging the sects of others wholly from attachment to his own, with intent to enhance the glory of his own sect, in reality by such conduct inflicts the severest injury on his own sect. Concord therefore is meritorious, to wit, hearkening and hearkening willingly to the Law of Piety, as accepted by other people.

Character | Conduct | Glory | Law | People | Piety | Reality | Reverence | Wit |

Benjamin Franklin

Doing an Injury puts you below your Enemy; Revenging one makes you even with him; Forgiving it sets you above him.

Character | Enemy |

Henry Home, Lord Kames

No man ever did a designed injury to another, but at the same time he did a greater to himself.

Character | Man | Time |

Fynes Moryson

He invites a new injury who bears the old patiently.

Character | Old |

Michel de Montaigne, fully Lord Michel Eyquem de Montaigne

I do myself a greater injury in lying than I do him of whom I tell a lie.

Character | Lying |

Publius Syrus

The best remedy for an injury is to forget it.

Character |

Publius Syrus

One ungrateful man does an injury to all who stand in need of aid.

Aid | Character | Man | Need |

Lord Samuel, Herbert Louis Samuel, First Viscount Samuel

Without doubt the greatest injury of all was done by basing morals on myth. For, sooner or later, myth is recognized for what it is, and disappears. Then morality loses the foundation on which it has been built.

Character | Doubt | Morality | Myth |

Edward Cooke

The home of everyone is to him his castle and fortress, as well for his defense against injury and violence, as for his repose.

Defense | Repose | Wisdom |

Xenophon, aka Xenophon of Athens NULL

Excess of grief for the dead is madness; for it is an injury to the living, and the dead know it not.

Excess | Grief | Madness | Wisdom |

Nicolas Chamfort,fully S├ębastien-Roch Nicolas De Chamfort, also spelled Nicholas

To enjoy and give enjoyment, without injury to yourself or others: this is true morality.

Enjoyment | Morality |